Vice President Venkaiah Naidu credits physical fitness and ‘desi’ food for his speedy recovery



Venkaiah Naidu wearing a suit and tie: He also expressed happiness at knowing that the other staff members who had contracted the disease in the Vice President Secretariat had also recovered from Coronavirus.


© Provided by The Financial Express
He also expressed happiness at knowing that the other staff members who had contracted the disease in the Vice President Secretariat had also recovered from Coronavirus.

Vice President Venkaiah Naidu has credited his speedy recovery from Coronavirus to his physical fitness, mental tenacity and desi food. In a long blog posted from his facebook account, the Vice President said that he firmly believed that it was his physical fitness and strict adherence to traditional food which ensured his recovery from the disease despite his old age and him being a diabetes patient.

“I could overcome COVID-19 infection because of my physical fitness, mental tenacity, regular physical exercise like walking and yoga, apart from eating only desi (traditional) food,” the Vice President wrote in his blog. He also said that he always preferred to eat traditional food and continued the practice during the quarantine period as well.

Naidu also urged his followers to include some form of physical exercise in their daily regimen like walking or Yoga in addition to advising against the consumption of junk food. Being a workaholic, Naidu, who had been under home quarantine for about a fortnight, kept busy with reading loads of books on India’s freedom struggle. A regular writer for a number of India’s dailies, Naidu also posted two articles every week on the same issue on facebook to apprise his followers of the role of many unsung heroes of the independence movement.

VP Naidu had contracted the disease on September 29 after which he went under home quarantine. After conducting the RT-PCR test, the team of doctors attending the Vice President declared him recovered after his report came negative on October 12. Naidu in his blog thanked the team of doctors and other staff members for taking care of him. He also expressed happiness at knowing that the other staff members who had contracted the disease in the Vice President Secretariat had also recovered from Coronavirus.

Source Article

Read More →

Local dentist on road to recovery after COVID-19

After multi-week battle against COVID-19, dentist speaks out

Updated


EDWARDSVILLE — When an email from the Illinois State Dental Society recommended for dental offices in the state to shut down for two weeks starting March 17, Glen Carbon dentist Dr. Briana Oller’s thoughts were on her patients at Simply Smiles.

“I was very scared. I was very nervous for my employees. I was nervous for my patients, who I wasn’t going to be able to serve. I was nervous for myself. How was I going to be able to make the bills of my business and the personal bills,” Oller said.

Those fears became secondary when Oller, 42 with no underlying issues, was diagnosed with coronavirus on March 30 after battling a headache, fever and loss of taste and smell. She was tested on March 26, nine days after a headache started.

“We don’t know where I got this. We have no clue,” said Oller, who hasn’t traveled outside the country. “We now know I’ve had my symptoms since March 17. We believe exposure occurred sometime around March 13 somewhere in the community because my mom is also positive for the coronavirus. She has followed a similar timeline but started a day later than me. The last time we were together was March 13. It is in our community and it has been this whole time.”




All of Oller’s patients and staff were made aware of the diagnosis and none have shown any symptoms. Her mom is also on the road to recovery.

Oller has been recovering from her home with her two daughters, who haven’t shown any symptoms.

All of Oller’s symptoms have subsided except the fever, which is hovering around 100.5 degrees. The highest it reached was 101.9 degrees.


“I’m getting stronger every day and it’s no longer up and down like it was. The breathing is so much better. I feel like the worst part is beyond me,” Oller said.

As of Sunday, Madison County was reporting 48 cases of coronavirus, including six females in their 40s, with 13 hospitalizations and 12 recoveries.

Late Thursday morning, Oller used a 10-minute Facebook video to share her emotions through the journey. As of Sunday afternoon, it has been viewed approximately 69,500 times and with over 2,800 shares.

“It actually was very hard for me to post because I’m a pretty private person, but I was

Read More →

Recovery and Recovery Support | SAMHSA

Recovery is a process of change through which people improve their health and wellness, live self-directed lives, and strive to reach their full potential. There are four major dimensions that support recovery:

  • Health—overcoming or managing one’s disease(s) or symptoms and making informed, healthy choices that support physical and emotional well-being.
  • Home—having a stable and safe place to live.
  • Purpose—conducting meaningful daily activities and having the independence, income, and resources to participate in society.
  • Community—having relationships and social networks that provide support, friendship, love, and hope.

Hope, the belief that these challenges and conditions can be overcome, is the foundation of recovery. The process of recovery is highly personal and occurs via many pathways. Recovery is characterized by continual growth and improvement in one’s health and wellness that may involve setbacks. Because setbacks are a natural part of life, resilience becomes a key component of recovery.

The process of recovery is supported through relationships and social networks. This often involves family members who become the champions of their loved one’s recovery. Families of people in recovery may experience adversities that lead to increased family stress, guilt, shame, anger, fear, anxiety, loss, grief, and isolation. The concept of resilience in recovery is also vital for family members who need access to intentional supports that promote their health and well-being. The support of peers and friends is also crucial in engaging and supporting individuals in recovery.

Recovery services and supports must be flexible. What may work for adults may be very different for youth or older adults. For example, the nature of social supports, peer mentors, and recovery coaching for adolescents is different than for adults and older adults. Supporting recovery requires that mental health and addiction services:

  • Be responsive and respectful to the health beliefs, practices, and cultural and linguistic needs of diverse people and groups.
  • Actively address diversity in the delivery of services.
  • Seek to reduce health disparities in access and outcomes.

SAMHSA established recovery support systems to promote partnering with people in recovery from mental and substance use disorders and their family members to guide the behavioral health system and promote individual, program, and system-level approaches that foster health and resilience (including helping individuals with behavioral health needs be well, manage symptoms, and achieve and maintain abstinence); increase housing to support recovery; reduce barriers to employment, education, and other life goals; and secure necessary social supports in their chosen community.

SAMHSA demonstrates that behavioral health is essential to health, prevention works, treatment is effective, and people recover from mental and/or substance use disorders.

Related Links

Source Article

Read More →