Pain Pill Abuse Higher in Adolescent CBD Oil Users

Adolescent users of cannabidiol (CBD) oil are far more likely to engage in risk-taking behaviors ― such as illegally taking prescription pain medications ― than peers who don’t use CBD, new research indicates.

The study, which included data on 200 youths aged 12 to 23 years, also suggests that 4 in 10 use CBD oil products. Users also reported experiencing increased anxiety over the prior 6 months, but the researchers couldn’t pinpoint whether CBD oil, which is marketed for anxiety relief, might contribute to participants’ anxiety levels.



Nicole Cumbo

“A lot of kids don’t talk to their clinicians about CBD” use, said study author Nicole Cumbo, BS, a third-year medical student at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pennsylvania.

“It’s important to ask kids if they’re using CBD, along with vaping and marijuana use, because it could be causing them more problems than it helps,” Cumbo told Medscape Medical News. “Monitoring for dangerous behaviors in their social history is important. Since we were able to see a correlation between risk-taking behaviors, we should ask kids about risk-taking behaviors as well.”

Touted as a panacea for conditions ranging from insomnia to muscle aches to low mood and more, CBD oil products have become ubiquitous across the United States, Cumbo noted. “Even if you go to a gas station, you see it,” she said. “It’s growing prevalence is apparent, but we weren’t sure what we’d see in our pediatric population.”

Cumbo and colleagues administered questionnaires to adolescents who presented for medical care to a level 1 pediatric trauma center/emergency department affiliated with a children’s hospital in central Pennsylvania. The questionnaire asked about demographics, risk-taking behaviors, and use of CBD oil products. The survey also asked participants about clinical symptoms experienced over the prior 6 months, along with their views on the perceived benefits of using CBD oil.

The average age of the participants was 17.6 years, and 63% were female. Forty percent reported CBD oil use. Compared to nonusers, among those who used CBD oil, there was significantly greater use of prescription medications without a prescription (19% vs 6%; P = .002), as well as greater use of cigarettes (40% vs 8%; P < .0001), chewing tobacco (18% vs 1%; P < .0001), and cigars (30% vs 3%; P < .0001).

No significant differences were found between CBD users and nonusers in symptoms such as chest pain, racing heart, difficulty breathing/cough, dizziness, abdominal discomfort, nausea/vomiting, headache, tremors, sleep disturbances, or dehydration over the prior 6 months.

However, those who used CBD were more likely to report experiencing an increase in anxiety over the prior 6 months (66% vs 47%; P = .009).

Regarding their perceived beliefs about CBD oil, 69% said it is “safer than other drugs,” 33% said it’s “just for fun,” and 48% said it can “help treat my medical illness.” Participants reported that myths about CBD oil include the notions that it’s a gateway drug and that it’s addictive.

“I think there’s a disconnect in

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Pill Identifier (Pill Finder) – Drugs.com

In order to proceed to the Pill Identification Wizard, you must read and accept the following terms:


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IN ADDITION, WITHOUT LIMITING THE FOREGOING, THE SERVICE HAS BEEN DESIGNED FOR USE IN THE UNITED STATES ONLY AND COVERS THE DRUG PRODUCTS USED IN PRACTICE IN THE UNITED STATES. MULTUM PROVIDES NO CLINICAL INFORMATION OR CHECKS FOR DRUGS NOT AVAILABLE FOR SALE IN THE UNITED STATES AND CLINICAL PRACTICE PATTERNS OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES MAY DIFFER SUBSTANTIALLY FROM INFORMATION SUPPLIED BY THE SERVICE. MULTUM DOES NOT WARRANT THAT USES OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES ARE APPROPRIATE.
The End-User acknowledges that updates to the Service are at the sole discretion of Multum, Truven Health Analytics, Inc. and Drugs.com. Multum, Truven Health Analytics, Inc. and Drugs.com make no representations or warranties whatsoever, express or implied, with respect to the compatibility of the Service, or future releases thereof, with any computer hardware or software, nor does Multum, Truven Health Analytics, Inc. and Drugs.com represent or warrant the continuity of

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Pill Identifier (Pill Finder Wizard)

Having trouble identifying prescription, OTC, generic, and brand name pills and capsules? Quickly identify drugs
and medications, including pill identifying pictures, using the RxList Pill Identifier Tool.

Use the imprint, color, or shape of your pill (one, all or any combination of the fields
below) and our Pill Identification Tool (Pill Finder) will show you pictures to review and identify your drug.

Pill Identification from a Doctor’s Perspective

Medical Author: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

In the emergency room where I work, I sometimes see patients who have either taken the wrong medication or
the wrong dose of medication. It is a common problem. Medication errors can cause serious consequences.
Doctors and pharmacists are diligent in making sure patients receive the correct medication. But mistakes
happen. As a consumer, you need to protect yourself and ensure you have the correct medication. Know the
medication and dose you should have received, and understand your condition.

The RxList Pill Identifier Tool will help you identify prescription, OTC, generic, and brand name drugs by
pill color, size, shape, and drug imprint. Match your drug imprint (Pill ID) to the pictures and quickly
identify your medications. If you do not find a match, call your doctor or pharmacist.

How To Use the RxList Pill Identifier/Pill Finder Tool

To accurately identify the pill, drug or medication, you can do any one, any combination of or all of the
following steps using our pill identifier tool.

  • Enter or Select from the drop down, the imprint code on the medication, (The imprint is the
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    using the symbol * (ie: Lupin*10)).
  • Select the color of the pill in the pull-down menu above.
  • Select the shape of the pill in the pull-down menu above.

Once you’ve found a drug id match, you’ll be able to link to a detailed description, drug picture, and
images in our comprehensive RxList Drug Database. You can also use the drug pictures to help identify
pills.

Pill Identifier Examples of Popular Drug Pictures and Images



Gabapentin 100 mg Cap-IVA

capsule, white, imprinted with Logo 4381, 100 mg
© Cerner Multum

Cymbalta 20 mg

capsule, green, imprinted with 20 mg, LILLY 3235
© Cerner Multum

Zocor 5 mg

shield, yellow, imprinted with ZOCOR, MSD 726
© Cerner Multum

Celexa 10 mg

oval, beige, imprinted with F P, 10 MG
© Cerner Multum

Topamax 200 mg

round, peach, imprinted with TOPAMAX, 200
© Cerner Multum

Top 10 Drugs Prescribed in the US and Their Side Effects

There are thousands of drugs prescribed every year for many different health problems. Tracking the most
frequently prescribed drugs is one way to see what types of health problems predominate in the U.S. You may
see some familiar drugs on this list that you, your relatives, and friends may take. People may know what
drug they take, but are not sure what the drug is supposed

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