Long School of Medicine, UT Health San Antonio

Robert Hromas, M.D., FACP
Dean, Long School of Medicine at
UT Health San Antonio

 





The Long School of Medicine at UT Health San Antonio is the largest trainer of physicians in South Texas, many of whom remain in San Antonio and the region to practice medicine. With full accreditation by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), the school annually educates more than 900 students and trains 800 residents.

The UT Health Physicians practice is the largest vertically integrated medical group in San Antonio with 850 physicians in more than 100 specialties. This is powerful for patients, because specialists who are at the top of their professions work together in close proximity. Only here can a patient see these specialists as part of one team, each talking to the other about the patient’s case. The spectrum of health care extends from primary care in health maintenance and disease prevention, all the way through the most complex specialty care, such as liver transplants or curing cardiac arrhythmias.

The Long School of Medicine and UT Health San Antonio have a highly productive research enterprise replete with basic scientific discoveries and state-of-the-art clinical care. World leaders in Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, cancer, aging and kidney disease, to name a few fields, are translating molecular discoveries into new therapies for these diseases. School of Medicine faculty members regularly publish in the top journals in the nation. UT Health San Antonio is one of the few universities with a National Institutes of Health-funded cancer center, NIH-funded aging center and NIH-funded clinical trials center. Only a dozen institutions in the country have all three.

San Antonio is fertile ground for testing new clinical treatments because demographically it is what the nation will look like in 20 years. The School of Medicine’s clinical, research and educational partnerships with University Health System, the military including the South Texas Veterans Health Care System, and numerous state and private partners enrich San Antonio’s large biosciences and health care economic sector.

Thank you for your interest in the Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long School of Medicine!

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How Medicine’s Long, Thin Supply Chain Threatens Americans

On the website of the Food and Drug Administration, there’s a page where the agency lists drugs that are in short supply in the United States. Last week, there were 90 entries on the list: antibiotics, drugs for anesthesia, compounds to light up veins and organs for imaging, immunosuppressives to prevent organ rejection, tube-feeding solutions, sedatives. For every type of medical problem, an important drug is off the market or in short supply—and this is routine.

In the fall, after Hurricane Maria tore through Puerto Rico, something new joined the list, not a drug but a category of medical equipment: bags of sterile salt water. When the territory’s electrical grid went down, it took out several plants that make bagged saline for US manufacturer Baxter International. Few noticed at first, until this winter’s flu season got bad. One of the first things you do when someone arrives at a hospital weak and feverish is plug them into a quart bag of saline to rehydrate them. Another might be giving them drugs through a smaller bag hooked to an IV drip. In many hospitals, both were suddenly rationed.

Maryn McKenna (@marynmck) is an Ideas contributor for WIRED. She writes about public and global health and food policy, and she is a senior fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University. She is the author of Beating Back the Devil, Superbug, and Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of How Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats. She previously wrote WIRED’s Superbug blog.

Missing IV bags and missing pharmaceuticals seem like unrelated problems, a temporary disruption layered on top of a longstanding problem. But in fact, they are unavailable for the same reason. The United States has allowed the manufacturing of most of its drugs and medical devices to drift offshore, at the end of long, thin supply chains.

If a single hurricane can break one of those chains, undermining the delivery of medical supplies that Americans need every day, imagine the impact of a border-crossing epidemic or a regional military conflict or a natural disaster like the volcanic eruption that shut down most of Europe’s airspace in 2010.

This ought to be a matter of national security. So far, it’s not.

Most people don’t have contact with the ongoing drug and IV shortages, so they can come as a shock. “My wife’s nurse had to stand for 30 mins and administer a drug slowly through a syringe because there are almost no IV bags in the continental US anymore,” Ben Boyer, a former TV executive who lives in San Diego and whose wife is undergoing chemotherapy for brain cancer, tweeted on December 28.

To physicians, though, it’s hellishly normal. “I am on staff at several different hospitals in western Pennsylvania, and there are weekly emails: These are the fluids on shortage, these are the ones in stock,” says Amesh Adalja, an infectious-disease physician and a senior scholar at Johns Hopkins University’s Center

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NYU Long Island School of Medicine

Welcome to NYU Long Island School of Medicine—a partnership between New York University and NYU Langone Health. In our program, we educate exemplary physicians and academic leaders in primary care, preparing our students to deliver outstanding patient care and become authorities in local and national health systems.

Our innovative three-year curriculum combines medical education, research, and quality patient care, and reduces the traditional medical school curriculum by one full year. We are proud to offer full-tuition scholarships for three years to all matriculated students who maintain satisfactory academic progress and professionalism standards, regardless of merit or financial need. By covering the majority of the cost of attendance, we hope to make it more financially feasible for you to choose careers in the important fields of primary care, internal medicine, pediatrics, and obstetrics and gynecology.

We integrate basic, translational, and clinical research with population health and health systems science to create a scientifically rigorous learning environment that is also diverse, inclusive, comprehensive, and compassionate.

We pair these innovations with a structured career and academic advising program that involves academic coaching, specialty advising, and monthly learning community sessions to offer a truly personal approach to medical education. It is my pleasure and honor to welcome you as our inaugural class.

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