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Our top priority is the health and safety of our patients and staff, our community and the public at large.

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    Social Determinants of Health | Healthy People 2020

    Goal

    Create social and physical environments that promote good health for all.

    Overview

    Health starts in our homes, schools, workplaces, neighborhoods, and communities. We know that taking care of ourselves by eating well and staying active, not smoking, getting the recommended immunizations and screening tests, and seeing a doctor when we are sick all influence our health. Our health is also determined in part by access to social and economic opportunities; the resources and supports available in our homes, neighborhoods, and communities; the quality of our schooling; the safety of our workplaces; the cleanliness of our water, food, and air; and the nature of our social interactions and relationships. The conditions in which we live explain in part why some Americans are healthier than others and why Americans more generally are not as healthy as they could be.

    Healthy People 2020 highlights the importance of addressing the social determinants of health by including “Create social and physical environments that promote good health for all” as one of the four overarching goals for the decade.1 This emphasis is shared by the World Health Organization, whose Commission on Social Determinants of Health in 2008 published the report, Closing the gap in a generation: Health equity through action on the social determinants of health.2 The emphasis is also shared by other U.S. health initiatives such as the National Partnership for Action to End Health Disparities 3 and the National Prevention and Health Promotion Strategy.4

    The Social Determinants of Health topic area within Healthy People 2020 is designed to identify ways to create social and physical environments that promote good health for all. All Americans deserve an equal opportunity to make the choices that lead to good health. But to ensure that all Americans have that opportunity, advances are needed not only in health care but also in fields such as education, childcare, housing, business, law, media, community planning, transportation, and agriculture. Making these advances involves working together to:

    • Explore how programs, practices, and policies in these areas affect the health of individuals, families, and communities.
    • Establish common goals, complementary roles, and ongoing constructive relationships between the health sector and these areas.
    • Maximize opportunities for collaboration among Federal-, state-, and local-level partners related to social determinants of health.

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    Understanding Social Determinants of Health

    Social determinants of health are conditions in the environments in which people are born, live, learn, work, play, worship, and age that affect a wide range of health, functioning, and quality-of-life outcomes and risks. Conditions (e.g., social, economic, and physical) in these various environments and settings (e.g., school, church, workplace, and neighborhood) have been referred to as “place.”5 In addition to the more material attributes of “place,” the patterns of social engagement and sense of security and well-being are also affected by where people live. Resources that enhance quality of life can have a significant influence on population health outcomes. Examples of these resources include safe and affordable housing, access to education, public safety, availability of healthy

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    Ask The Dentist Dental Health Directory Ask Dental Questions Get Professional Answers for Dental Problems

    Dental Health Directory Library

    Dental Library Research Stacks

    Got a question that you can’t find an answer for? Contact us…we may be able to help.

    First, check the FAQ Section to see if the information you are seeking, in general terms, is available already. If not, go to the bottom of any page and click on the link for asking a question..

    Find Related Information even Faster

    Need even MORE information but is GROUPED by general treatment need? Try using the Grouped Index that has FAQ’s, articles and video links grouped together that can reveal more information faster.

    Or…. you can use the Google Search Engine to find information contained in this website. Look for the Google search box at the bottom of each page.

    Meet the Dentists to learn more about the dental expertise available for your questions.

    Consumer Alert:

    ALL of the responses and ALL of the dental articles appearing on this site were prepared, authored and/or edited by licensed dentistry professionals.

    It has come to our attention that portions of our copyrighted material are being copied and used by various dental directories, portal websites, insurance companies and other dental websites, including individual dental practices.

    Consumers should be vigilant in verifying the source of any professional discussion about dental care and treatment descriptions. It is suspected that many sources of apparent reputability… are not.

    This forum has been developed in response to increased need for technical answers. Your participation in the use of this Dental Health Directory and Library as a final resource for obtaining answers or additional information for difficult or unusual dental questions has created a unique public resource.

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    Health Information, News & Lifestyle Tips

    Sponsors of Brave

    Acts of ordinary courage, of brave compassion that put the health of patients first – these are the everyday heroes of the healthcare profession. Join News24 and Adcock Ingram OTC in celebrating and sharing your stories of pharmacists and healthcare professionals who have gone above and beyond the day-to-day call of duty.

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    Long School of Medicine, UT Health San Antonio

    Robert Hromas, M.D., FACP
    Dean, Long School of Medicine at
    UT Health San Antonio

     





    The Long School of Medicine at UT Health San Antonio is the largest trainer of physicians in South Texas, many of whom remain in San Antonio and the region to practice medicine. With full accreditation by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), the school annually educates more than 900 students and trains 800 residents.

    The UT Health Physicians practice is the largest vertically integrated medical group in San Antonio with 850 physicians in more than 100 specialties. This is powerful for patients, because specialists who are at the top of their professions work together in close proximity. Only here can a patient see these specialists as part of one team, each talking to the other about the patient’s case. The spectrum of health care extends from primary care in health maintenance and disease prevention, all the way through the most complex specialty care, such as liver transplants or curing cardiac arrhythmias.

    The Long School of Medicine and UT Health San Antonio have a highly productive research enterprise replete with basic scientific discoveries and state-of-the-art clinical care. World leaders in Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, cancer, aging and kidney disease, to name a few fields, are translating molecular discoveries into new therapies for these diseases. School of Medicine faculty members regularly publish in the top journals in the nation. UT Health San Antonio is one of the few universities with a National Institutes of Health-funded cancer center, NIH-funded aging center and NIH-funded clinical trials center. Only a dozen institutions in the country have all three.

    San Antonio is fertile ground for testing new clinical treatments because demographically it is what the nation will look like in 20 years. The School of Medicine’s clinical, research and educational partnerships with University Health System, the military including the South Texas Veterans Health Care System, and numerous state and private partners enrich San Antonio’s large biosciences and health care economic sector.

    Thank you for your interest in the Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long School of Medicine!

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    Click to watch a video explaining How Medicare Works

    Medicare

    Do you qualify for Medicare? You might have Medicare plan options beyond the federal program, Original Medicare (Part A and Part B). Find out about Medicare Advantage plans, Medicare Prescription Drug Plans, and Medicare Supplement plans.

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    Defining and preserving good health

    The word health refers to a state of complete emotional and physical well-being. Healthcare exists to help people maintain this optimal state of health.

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), healthcare costs in the United States were $3.5 trillion in 2017.

    However, despite this expenditure, people in the U.S. have a lower life expectancy than people in other developed countries. This is due to a variety of factors, including access to healthcare and lifestyle choices.

    Good health is central to handling stress and living a longer, more active life. In this article, we explain the meaning of good health, the types of health a person needs to consider, and how to preserve good health.

    In 1948, the World Health Organization (WHO) defined health with a phrase that modern authorities still apply.

    “Health is a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.”

    In 1986, the WHO made further clarifications:

    “A resource for everyday life, not the objective of living. Health is a positive concept emphasizing social and personal resources, as well as physical capacities.”

    This means that health is a resource to support an individual’s function in wider society, rather than an end in itself. A healthful lifestyle provides the means to lead a full life with meaning and purpose.

    In 2009, researchers publishing inThe Lancet defined health as the ability of a body to adapt to new threats and infirmities.

    They base this definition on the idea that the past few decades have seen modern science take significant strides in the awareness of diseases by understanding how they work, discovering new ways to slow or stop them, and acknowledging that an absence of pathology may not be possible.

    Mental and physical health are probably the two most frequently discussed types of health.

    Spiritual, emotional, and financial health also contribute to overall health. Medical experts have linked these to lower stress levels and improved mental and physical well-being.

    People with better financial health, for example, may worry less about finances and have the means to buy fresh food more regularly. Those with good spiritual health may feel a sense of calm and purpose that fuels good mental health.

    Physical health

    A person who has good physical health is likely to have bodily functions and processes working at their peak.

    This is not only due not only to an absence of disease. Regular exercise, balanced nutrition, and adequate rest all contribute to good health. People receive medical treatment to maintain the balance, when necessary.

    Physical well-being involves pursuing a healthful lifestyle to decrease the risk of disease. Maintaining physical fitness, for example, can protect and develop the endurance of a person’s breathing and heart function, muscular strength, flexibility, and body composition.

    Looking after physical health and well-being also involves reducing the risk of an injury or health issue, such as:

    • minimizing hazards in the workplace
    • using contraception when having sex
    • practicing effective hygiene
    • avoiding the use of
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    Health officials warn against Mother’s Day gatherings while modeling projects more US deaths than expected

    “As a result, COVID-19 spread among attendees. Remember, the best way to celebrate #MothersDay and any other occasion is by STAYING HOME and staying healthy”

    Louisiana health officials suggested safe alternatives, like having a virtual brunch together.

    For those still planning to see their mothers in person, “Resist the temptation to hug your mom and maintain six feet of separation,” the Louisiana Department of Public Health said.
    Older adults have the highest risk of severe complications or death from coronavirus. And the numbers of cases and deaths keep rising.
    By Sunday, more than 1,320,000 people in the US have been infected, and more than 79,000 have died, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

    ‘Explosive increases in mobility’ leads to more projected deaths

    A projection model cited by the White House now predicts thousands more deaths, largely due to “explosive increases in mobility in a number of states.”

    The model, from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, now forecasts 137,000 deaths in the United States by August, up from an earlier prediction of about 134,000.
    Pew Research Poll: Two-thirds of Americans are concerned states will lift restrictions too quickly

    IHME Director Dr. Christopher Murray said cell phone data shows Americans are moving more, suggesting more infections to come.

    “We’re seeing just explosive increases in mobility in a number of states that we expect will translate into more cases and deaths in 10 days from now,” Murray told CBS’ “Face the Nation” on Sunday.

    “What’s driving the change is, simply put, the rise in mobility,” Murray said. “We’re seeing in some states a 20 percentage point increase in just 10 days in mobility. And that will translate into more human contact, more transmission.”

    He said the top five states that have seen increased mobility are Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota and Georgia.

    Other states have seen a 15-20 percentage point increase in mobility, according to an IHME press release: Alabama, Alaska, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

    Here's when the US job market will recover
    But as unemployment rates soar, governors are starting to reopen more businesses — even though many have not yet met all of the White House’s guidelines on when to safely do so.
    Most states have eased restrictions. See where your state stands
    And public health experts have said there’s still not enough testing or contact tracing to safely reopen the country.
    But no one will know the health effects of each state’s reopening for weeks.
    “It will be at least two to three weeks before we see an increase in the number of infections because it takes time for individuals to infect others and for them to display symptoms,” said data scientist Youyang Gu, whose coronavirus projection model is cited by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
    What we can learn from other places that reopened -- and how we can keep our numbers low

    For those who might succumb to new infections, “around three weeks is the average time between infection to death,” said Gu, citing studies from Italy and China.

    Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has said if measures are lifted
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    Utah Department of Health

    For the most current information about Coronavirus, go to coronavirus.utah.gov.

    If you’re worried about whether you may have COVID-19, please call the Utah Coronavirus Information Line at 1-800-456-7707.

    Si está preocupado de que tal vez pueda tener COVID-19, llame a la línea de información del Coronavirus de Utah 1-800-456-7707.

    For language materials and resources visit our Coronavirus page.

    Join us in helping all Utahns reach their highest health potential

    The Office of Health Disparities (OHD) is committed to a vision where all people have a fair opportunity to reach their highest health potential given that health is crucial for well-being, longevity, and economic and social mobility.

    You will find:

    It Takes a Village Giving Our Babies the Best Chance Logo

    The It Takes A Village: Giving Our Babies the Best Chance program is an ongoing effort by the Utah Department of Health Office of Health Disparities (OHD) to address birth outcomes among Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander communities. OHD has developed a culturally relevant curriculum aimed at creating healthier communities and babies. The new curriculum has been released . Check it out and start a group near you.

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    45 best health tips ever








    We’ve done the legwork for you and here they are: the 45 best health tips. Make that 46 – taking the time to read this tops the list.

    1. Copy your kitty: Learn to do stretching exercises when you wake up. It boosts circulation and digestion, and eases back pain.

    2. Don’t skip breakfast. Studies show that eating a proper breakfast is one of the most positive things you can do if you are trying to lose weight. Breakfast skippers tend to gain weight. A balanced breakfast includes fresh fruit or fruit juice, a high-fibre breakfast cereal, low-fat milk or yoghurt, wholewheat toast, and a boiled egg.

    3. Brush up on hygiene. Many people don’t know how to brush their teethproperly. Improper brushing can cause as much damage to the teeth and gums as not brushing at all. Lots of people don’t brush for long enough, don’t floss and don’t see a dentist regularly. Hold your toothbrush in the same way that would hold a pencil, and brush for at least two minutes.

    This includes brushing the teeth, the junction of the teeth and gums, the tongue and the roof of the mouth. And you don’t need a fancy, angled toothbrush – just a sturdy, soft-bristled one that you replace each month.

    4. Neurobics for your mind. Get your brain fizzing with energy. American researchers coined the term ‘neurobics’ for tasks which activate the brain’s own biochemical pathways and to bring new pathways online that can help to strengthen or preserve brain circuits.

    Brush your teeth with your ‘other’ hand, take a new route to work or choose your clothes based on sense of touch rather than sight. People with mental agility tend to have lower rates of Alzheimer’s disease and age-related mental decline.

    5. Get what you give! Always giving and never taking? This is the short road to compassion fatigue. Give to yourself and receive from others, otherwise you’ll get to a point where you have nothing left to give. And hey, if you can’t receive from others, how can you expect them to receive from you?

    Read: Mind aerobics

    6. Get spiritual. A study conducted by the formidably sober and scientific Harvard University found that patients who were prayed for recovered quicker than those who weren’t, even if they weren’t aware of the prayer.

    7. Get smelly. Garlic, onions, spring onions and leeks all contain stuff that’s good for you. A study at the Child’s Health Institute in Cape Town found that eating raw garlic helped fight serious childhood infections. Heat destroys these properties, so eat yours raw, wash it down with fruit juice or, if you’re a sissy, have it in tablet form.

    8. Knock one back. A glass of red wine a day is good for you. A number of studies have found this, but a recent one found that the polyphenols (a type of antioxidant) in green tea, red wine and olives may also help protect you

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