definition of fitness by Medical dictionary

fit·ness

(fit’nes),

1. Well-being.

2. Suitability.

3. In population genetics, a measure of the relative survival and reproductive success of a given individual or phenotype, or of a population subgroup.

4. A set of attributes, primarily respiratory and cardiovascular, relating to ability to perform tasks requiring expenditure of energy.

Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

fitness

(fĭt′nĭs)

n.

1. The state or condition of being fit; suitability or appropriateness.

2. Good health, especially good physical condition resulting from exercise and proper nutrition.

3. Biology The extent to which an organism is able to produce offspring in a particular environment.

The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

fitness

Health The ability or capacity to perform a particular task. See Aerobic fitness, Cardioivascular fitness, Physical fitness.

McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fit·ness

(fit’nĕs)

1. Well-being.

2. Suitability.

3. population genetics A measure of the relative survival and reproductive success of a given individual or phenotype, or of a population subgroup.

4. A set of attributes, primarily respiratory and cardiovascular, relating to the ability to perform tasks requiring expenditures of energy.

Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

fitness

The ability to undertake sustained physical exertion without undue breathlessness. Fitness is associated with a sense of physical and mental well being. The achievement of fitness is possible only by making regular demands on the body to perform physical tasks. As fitness improves the bulk and strength of the voluntary muscles and the force and pumping efficiency of the heart muscle increase. The respiratory muscles perform more effectively. The subject is able to perform more work within the limits of the rate at which oxygen is supplied by the lungs and circulation (aerobic exercise). Recovery from fatigue is more rapid, a higher degree of muscle tension can be attained, the muscles are able to utilize glucose and fatty acids in the presence of less insulin, and the liver is better able to maintain the supply of glucose to the blood, and hence to the muscles, during strenuous exercise. The energy-producing elements in the muscle cells (the mitochondria) increase in size and number.

Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

fitness

the ability of an organism to transfer its genes to the next generation. Organisms favoured by SELECTION (natural or artificial) have a high fitness, while those subjected to adverse selection pressure have a low fitness. Thus, under conditions of insecticide treatment, resistant members of an insect population will have a high fitness and produce more offspring as compared to susceptible individuals that have a low fitness.

Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

fit·ness

(fit’nĕs)

1. Well-being.

2. Suitability.

Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about fitness

Q. I mean what this fitness

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RxList Drug Medical Dictionary with Medical Definitions

The RxList drug medical dictionary contains definitions and explanations of many medical terms including prescription medication abbreviations. Medical terms are from MedTerms™ and are written by pharmacists and U.S. Board Certified Physicians; the same authors of the Webster’s New World™ Medical Dictionary. To use the medical dictionary, type in your word in the dictionary search box below and click search. You can also browse the terms by selecting on a letter.

Drug Medical Dictionary of Terms by Letter

Definitions of Common Abbreviations on Prescriptions

Popular Medical Terms from the RxList Dictionary

Need help identifying pills? Try the RxList Pill Identifier Tool.


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definition of medicine by Medical dictionary

medicine

 [med´ĭ-sin]

1. any drug or remedy.

2. the art and science of the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.

3. the nonsurgical treatment of disease.

aviation medicine the branch of medicine that deals with the physiologic, medical, psychologic, and epidemiologic problems involved in flying.

ayurvedic medicine the traditional medicine of India, done according to Hindu scriptures and making use of plants and other healing materials native to India.

clinical medicine

1. the study of disease by direct examination of the living patient.

2. the last two years of the usual curriculum in a medical college.

complementary medicine (complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)) a large and diverse set of systems of diagnosis, treatment, and prevention based on philosophies and techniques other than those used in conventional Western medicine, often derived from traditions of medical practice used in other, non-Western cultures. Such practices may be described as alternative, that is, existing as a body separate from and as a replacement for conventional Western medicine, or complementary, that is, used in addition to conventional Western practice. CAM is characterized by its focus on the whole person as a unique individual, on the energy of the body and its influence on health and disease, on the healing power of nature and the mobilization of the body’s own resources to heal itself, and on the treatment of the underlying causes, rather than symptoms, of disease. Many of the techniques used are the subject of controversy and have not been validated by controlled studies.
emergency medicine the medical specialty that deals with the acutely ill or injured who require immediate medical treatment. See also emergency and emergency care.

experimental medicine study of the science of healing diseases based on experimentation in animals.

group medicine the practice of medicine by a group of physicians, usually representing various specialties, who are associated together for the cooperative diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.

internal medicine the medical specialty that deals with diagnosis and medical treatment of diseases and disorders of internal structures of the body.

nuclear medicine the branch of medicine concerned with the use of radionuclides in diagnosis and treatment of disease.

patent medicine a drug or remedy protected by a trademark, available without a prescription.

preclinical medicine the subjects studied in medicine before the student observes actual diseases in patients.

preventive medicine the branch of medical study and practice aimed at preventing disease and promoting health.

proprietary medicine any chemical, drug, or similar preparation used in the treatment of diseases, if such article is protected against free competition as to name, product, composition, or process of manufacture by secrecy, patent, trademark, or copyright, or by other means.

psychosomatic medicine the study of the interrelations between bodily processes and emotional life.

socialized medicine a system of medical care regulated and controlled by the government; called also state medicine.
space medicine the branch of aviation medicine concerned with conditions encountered by human beings in space.

sports medicine the field of

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Health | Wex Legal Dictionary / Encyclopedia

Health Law: An Overview

Broadly defined, health law includes the law of public health, health care generally, and medical care specifically. Preserving public health is a primary duty of the state. Health regulations and laws are therefore almost all administered at the state level. Many states delegate authority to subordinate governmental agencies such as boards of health. These boards are created by legislative acts.

Federal health law focuses on the activity of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). It administers a wide variety of agencies and programs, like providing financial assistance to needy individuals; conducting medical and scientific research; providing health care and advocacy services; and enforcing laws and regulations related to human services. An important part of the HHS are the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which oversee the Medicare and Medicaid Programs. Their goal is to ensure that elderly and needy individuals receive proper medical care.

Private health insurance originated with the Blue Cross system in 1929. The underlying principle was to spread the risk of high hospitalization bills between all individuals. Whether sick or healthy, all school teachers and hospital employees in the Dallas area had to join, ensuring that the risk was spread through a large number of individuals. Blue Shield was later developed under the same principle.

Today, many people receive health care through health maintenance organizations (HMO’s). Managed care essentially creates a triangle relationship between physician, patient, and payer. Physicians are paid a flat per-member per-month fee for basic health care services, regardless of whether the patient seeks those services. The risk that a patient is going to require significant treatment shifts from the insurance company to the physicians under this model. Because of the importance of the industry, HMO’s are heavily regulated. On the federal level the Health Maintenance Organization Act of 1973 governs.

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health – English-French Dictionary WordReference.com

Principales traductions health nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (state of body, mind) (d’une personne) santé nfnom féminin: s’utilise avec les articles “la”, “l'” (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), “une”. Ex : fille – nf > On dira “la fille” ou “une fille”. Avec un nom féminin, l’adjectif s’accorde. En général, on ajoute un “e” à l’adjectif. Par exemple, on dira “une petite fille”.   The doctor said that he is in good health.   Le docteur lui dit qu’il était en bonne santé. health nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (soundness of body, mind) (d’une personne) santé nfnom féminin: s’utilise avec les articles “la”, “l'” (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), “une”. Ex : fille – nf > On dira “la fille” ou “une fille”. Avec un nom féminin, l’adjectif s’accorde. En général, on ajoute un “e” à l’adjectif. Par exemple, on dira “une petite fille”.   Despite his age, he still has health of mind and body.   Malgré son âge, il avait santé d’esprit et de corps. health nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. figurative (state, condition) (d’un objet) état nmnom masculin: s’utilise avec les articles “le”, “l'” (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), “un”. Ex : garçon – nm > On dira “le garçon” ou “un garçon”.   My washing machine is still in good health after fifteen years!   Ma machine à laver était toujours en bon état après quinze ans. health nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. figurative (of company, nation) (d’une entreprise,…) santé nfnom féminin: s’utilise avec les articles “la”, “l'” (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), “une”. Ex : fille – nf > On dira “la fille” ou “une fille”. Avec un nom féminin, l’adjectif s’accorde. En général, on ajoute un “e” à l’adjectif. Par exemple, on dira “une petite fille”.   The health of the company could not be better.   La santé de la société ne pouvait pas être meilleure. health nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (school subject) (Université) santé publique, santé publique et économie de la santé nfnom féminin: s’utilise avec les articles “la”, “l'” (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), “une”. Ex : fille – nf > On dira “la fille” ou “une fille”. Avec un nom féminin, l’adjectif s’accorde. En général, on ajoute un “e” à l’adjectif. Par exemple, on dira “une petite fille”. Note: Matière scolaire qui n’existe pas en France dans le secondaire.   Tim did health as a school subject three years ago.   Tim a suivi un cours de santé publique il y a trois ans.
Formes composées bad health nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (illness) mauvaise santé nfnom féminin
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definition of fitness by The Free Dictionary

The former measured all actions by the unalterable rule of right, and the eternal fitness of things; the latter decided all matters by authority; but in doing this, he always used the scriptures and their commentators, as the lawyer doth his Coke upon Lyttleton, where the comment is of equal authority with the text.
The title suggests all kinds of mysteries; a glance at the chapter-headings quickly confirms the suspicions already aroused, and the sub-title: “A Book for All and None”, generally succeeds in dissipating the last doubts the prospective purchaser may entertain concerning his fitness for the book or its fitness for him.
A Dodson would not be taxed with the omission of anything that was becoming, or that belonged to that eternal fitness of things which was plainly indicated in the practice of the most substantial parishioners, and in the family traditions,–such as obedience to parents, faithfulness to kindred, industry, rigid honesty, thrift, the thorough scouring of wooden and copper utensils, the hoarding of coins likely to disappear from the currency, the production of first-rate commodities for the market, and the general preference of whatever was home-made.
He may not kill you, Sarkoja, it is not our custom, but there is nothing to prevent him tying one end of a strap about your neck and the other end to a wild thoat, merely to test your fitness to survive and help perpetuate our race.
“Even your good opinion of my fitness,” replied the Gentleman, “shall not persuade me.”
For in the first hour of meeting you, I had an impression of your eminent and perhaps exclusive fitness to supply that need (connected, I may say, with such activity of the affections as even the preoccupations of a work too special to be abdicated could not uninterruptedly dissimulate); and each succeeding opportunity for observation has given the impression an added depth by convincing me more emphatically of that fitness which I had preconceived, and thus evoking more decisively those affections to which I have but now referred.
As treason is a crime levelled at the immediate being of the society, when the laws have once ascertained the guilt of the offender, there seems a fitness in referring the expediency of an act of mercy towards him to the judgment of the legislature.
As for the metre, the heroic measure has proved its fitness by the test of experience.
He liked to talk and he talked well, adorning his speech with terms of endearment and with folk sayings which Pierre thought he invented himself, but the chief charm of his talk lay in the fact that the commonest events- sometimes just such as Pierre had witnessed without taking notice of them- assumed in Karataev’s a character of solemn fitness. He liked to hear the folk tales one of the soldiers used to tell of an evening
The Senator was by no means to undertake my instruction himself; his nephew, who had just begun to read law, was to
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medicine – English-French Dictionary WordReference.com

Principales traductions medicine nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (science: treating illness) (science) médecine nfnom féminin: s’utilise avec les articles “la”, “l'” (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), “une”. Ex : fille – nf > On dira “la fille” ou “une fille”. Avec un nom féminin, l’adjectif s’accorde. En général, on ajoute un “e” à l’adjectif. Par exemple, on dira “une petite fille”.   Modern medicine has made many advances.   La médecine moderne a fait beaucoup de progrès. medicine nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (profession: healthcare) (profession) médecine nfnom féminin: s’utilise avec les articles “la”, “l'” (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), “une”. Ex : fille – nf > On dira “la fille” ou “une fille”. Avec un nom féminin, l’adjectif s’accorde. En général, on ajoute un “e” à l’adjectif. Par exemple, on dira “une petite fille”.   My brother is studying medicine at university.   Mon frère est inscrit à la faculté de médecine. medicine nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (medication) médicament nmnom masculin: s’utilise avec les articles “le”, “l'” (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), “un”. Ex : garçon – nm > On dira “le garçon” ou “un garçon”.   Many people take medicine when they are sick.   Beaucoup de gens malades prennent des médicaments.   Traductions supplémentaires medicine [sb] vtrtransitive verb: Verb taking a direct object–for example, “Say something.” “She found the cat.” (give medicine to) donner des médicaments à [qqn] loc vlocution verbale: groupe de mots fonctionnant comme un verbe. Ex : “faire référence à”    (vieilli) médicamenter⇒ vtrverbe transitif: verbe qui s’utilise avec un complément d’objet direct (COD). Ex : “J’écris une lettre”. “Elle a retrouvé son chat”.
Formes composées alternative medicine nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (treatments: homeopathic) médecine douce nfnom féminin: s’utilise avec les articles “la”, “l'” (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), “une”. Ex : fille – nf > On dira “la fille” ou “une fille”. Avec un nom féminin, l’adjectif s’accorde. En général, on ajoute un “e” à l’adjectif. Par exemple, on dira “une petite fille”. alternative medicine nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (medical treatment: non-conventional) médecine parallèle nfnom féminin: s’utilise avec les articles “la”, “l'” (devant une voyelle ou un h muet), “une”. Ex : fille – nf > On dira “la fille” ou “une fille”. Avec un nom féminin, l’adjectif s’accorde. En général, on ajoute un “e” à l’adjectif. Par exemple, on dira “une petite fille”.   Après l’échec des traitements conventionnels, elle se tourna vers les médecines parallèles. ayurvedic medicine nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (ancient healthcare philosophy) médecine ayurvédique nfnom féminin: s’utilise avec les articles
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definition of medicine by The Free Dictionary

medicine

Quotations
“Formerly, when religion was strong and science weak, men mistook magic for medicine; now, when science is strong and religion weak, men mistake medicine for magic” [Thomas Szasz The Second Skin]

Medicine

Branches of medicine  aetiology or etiology, anaesthetics, anaplasty, anatomy, andrology, angiology, audiology, aviation medicine, bacteriology, balneology, bioastronautics, biomedicine, cardiology, chiropody, dental hygiene or oral hygiene, dental surgery, dentistry, dermatology, diagnostics, eccrinology, electrophysiology, electrotherapeutics, embryology, encephalography, endocrinology, endodontics, epidemiology, exodontics, forensic or legal medicine, gastroenterology, genitourinary medicine, geratology, geriatrics, gerontology, gynaecology or (U.S.) gynecology, haematology or (U.S.) hematology, hydrotherapeutics, immunochemistry, immunology, industrial medicine, internal medicine, laryngology, materia medica, midwifery, morbid anatomy, myology, neonatology, nephrology, neuroanatomy, neuroendocrinology, neurology, neuropathology, neurophysiology, neuropsychiatry, neurosurgery, nosology, nostology, nuclear medicine, nutrition, obstetrics, odontology, oncology, ophthalmology, optometry, orthodontics or orthodontia, orthopaedics or (U.S.) orthopedics, orthoptics, orthotics, osteology, osteoplasty, otolaryngology, otology, paediatrics or (U.S.) pediatrics, pathology, periodontics, pharyngology, physical medicine, physiotherapy or (U.S.) physiatrics, plastic surgery, posology, preventive medicine, proctology, psychiatry, psychoanalysis, psychology, radiology, rheumatology, rhinology, serology, space medicine, spare-part surgery, speech therapy, sports medicine, stomatology, surgery, symptomatology, syphilology, therapeutics, tocology or tokology, toxicology, trichology, urology, venereology, veterinary science or medicine, virology

Medical practitioners and specialists  aetiologist or etiologist, anaesthetist, anatomist, andrologist, audiologist, bacteriologist, balneologist, barefoot doctor, cardiologist, chiropodist, consultant, dental hygienist or oral hygienist, dentist or dental surgeon, dermatologist, diagnostician, dietitian, district nurse, doctor, electrophysiologist, embryologist, endocrinologist, endodontist, epidemiologist, exodontist, extern or externe (U.S. & Canad.), forensic scientist, gastroenterologist, general practitioner or GP, geriatrician or geriatrist, gerontologist, gynaecologist or (U.S.) gynecologist, haematologist or (U.S.) hematologist, health visitor, house physician, houseman, hydrotherapist, immunologist, intern or interne (U.S. & Canad.), internist, junior doctor, laboratory technician, laryngologist, matron, midwife, myologist, neonatologist, nephrologist, neuroanatomist, neurologist, neuropathologist, neurophysiologist, neuropsychiatrist, neurosurgeon, nosologist, nurse, nursing officer, nutritionist, obstetrician, occupational therapist, odontologist, oncologist, ophthalmologist, optician, optometrist, orderly, orthodontist, orthopaedist or (U.S.) orthopedist, orthoptist, orthotist, osteologist, otolaryngologist, otologist, paediatrician or (U.S.) pediatrician, paramedic, pathologist, pharyngologist, physiotherapist or physio, plastic surgeon, proctologist, psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, psychologist, radiographer, radiologist, registrar, resident (U.S. & Canad.), rheumatologist, rhinologist, serologist, speech therapist, surgeon, syphilologist, therapist, toxicologist, trichologist, urologist, venereologist, veterinary surgeon, vet or (U.S.) veterinarian, virologist

Medical and surgical instruments and equipment  arthroscope, artificial heart, artificial kidney, aspirator, bandage, bedpan, bistoury, bronchoscope, cannula or canula, cardiograph, catheter, catling, clamp, clinical thermometer, colonoscope, colposcope, compressor, CT scanner or CAT scanner, curet or curette, cystoscope, defibrillator, depressor, dialysis machine, drain, electrocardiograph, electroencephalograph, electromyograph, encephalogram, endoscope, fetoscope, fibrescope or (U.S.) fiberscope, fluoroscope, forceps, gamma camera, gastroscope, gonioscope, haemostat or (U.S.) hemostat, heart-lung machine, heat lamp, hypodermic or hypodermic needle, hypodermic or hypodermic syringe, inhalator, inspirator, iron lung, kidney machine, kymograph or cymograph, lancet or lance, laparoscope, laryngoscope, life-support machine, microscope, nebulizer, needle, nephroscope, oesophagoscope or (U.S.) esophagoscope, ophthalmoscope, orthoscope, otoscope, oxygen mask, oxygen tent, pacemaker, packing, perimeter, pharyngoscope, plaster cast, pneumatometer, pneumograph, probe, proctoscope, Pulmotor (trademark), raspatory, respirator, resuscitator, retinoscope, retractor, rheometer, rhinoscope, roentgenoscope or röntgenoscope, scalpel, scanner, skiascope, sling, sound, specimen bottle, speculum, sphygmograph, sphygmomanometer, spirograph, spirometer, splint, stethoscope, stomach pump,

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definition of dentist by The Free Dictionary

Then you would manage to stammer forth the confession that you were neither a doctor nor a dentist. Mrs.
I will not accept as the crown of my desires a block of buildings with tenements for the poor on a lease of a thousand years, and perhaps with a sign-board of a dentist hanging out.
* Another case, very clearly described by a dentist, occurred at the town of Columbus, in the United States of America, quite recently.
She flitted, at the far end of it, into impenetrable regions, and I looked at the place with my heart beating as I had known it to do in the dentist‘s parlor.
And between the lips were teeth that had never known nor needed the dentist‘s care.
There was a dentist‘s sign, among others, which adorned the entrance, and after staring a moment at the pair of artificial jaws which slowly opened and shut to draw attention to a fine set of teeth, the young gentleman put on his coat, took his hat, and went down to post himself in the opposite doorway, saying with a smile and a shiver, “It’s like her to come alone, but if she has a bad time she’ll need someone to help her home.”
Harriet really wished, and had wished some time, to consult a dentist. Mrs.
Passing the door of a fashionable dentist, she had met Lord Montbarry himself just leaving the house.
Next minute “the unobstructed beam” was shining right into the knapsack itself, for all the world like one of those little demon electric lights with which the dentist makes a momentary treasure-cave of your distended jaws, flashing with startled stalactite.
Noel Vanstone, after nervously following his host’s example, composed himself to meet the coming ordeal, with reclining head and grasping hands, in the position familiarly associated to all civilized humanity with a seat in a dentist‘s chair.
But it was not so easy a matter to get out of the clutches of the old wizard; he fastened on the unfortunate limb as if it were something for which he had been long seeking, and muttering some kind of incantation continued his discipline, pounding it after a fashion that set me well nigh crazy; while Mehevi, upon the same principle which prompts an affectionate mother to hold a struggling child in a dentist‘s chair, restrained me in his powerful grasp, and actually encouraged the wretch in this infliction of torture.
A general laugh followed this sally at the dentist‘s expense, in the midst of which the gleeman placed his battered harp upon his knee, and began to pick out a melody upon the frayed strings.

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definition of health by Medical dictionary

health

 [helth]

a relative state in which one is able to function well physically, mentally, socially, and spiritually in order to express the full range of one’s unique potentialities within the environment in which one is living. In the words of René Dubos, “health is primarily a measure of each person’s ability to do and become what he wants to become.” 

Current views of health and illness recognize health as more than the absence of disease. Realizing that humans are dynamic beings whose state of health can change from day to day or even from hour to hour, leaders in the health field suggest that it is better to think of each person as being located on a graduated scale or continuous spectrum (continuum) ranging from obvious dire illness through the absence of discernible disease to a state of optimal functioning in every aspect of one’s life. High-level wellness is described as a dynamic process in which the individual is actively engaged in moving toward fulfillment of his or her potential.

A common concept of health as a continuum ranging from optimal wellness at one end to illness culminating in death at the other end.

health education.
1. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as developing and providing instruction and learning experiences to facilitate voluntary adaptation of behavior conducive to health in individuals, families, groups, or communities.

2. See Window on Health Education.

health as expanding consciousness a conceptual model of nursing formulated by Margaret A. newman which offers a paradigm based on the view of health as the undivided wholeness of the person in interaction with the environment. The four key concepts of her model are consciousness, movement, space, and time. Consciousness is defined as the informational capacity of the human system, or the capacity of the system to interact with the environment. Movement is the manifestation of consciousness, viewed as waves of energy and energy transformation in the space and time of a person’s life.

Person and environment are defined as co-extensive, open energy fields. The two evolve together and move toward increasing complexity and diversity, manifested in patterns of interaction that occur along continua of time and space. Person is also defined as a specific pattern of consciousness.

Health is a process of expanding consciousness that synthesizes disease and non-disease and is recognized by patterns of person-environment interaction. An understanding of pattern is basic to an understanding of health, and involves the movement from looking at parts to looking at the whole. Pattern is defined as information that depicts the whole, and gives an understanding of the meaning of relationships.

Nursing is an integrative force within the new paradigm of health seen as the undivided wholeness of the person in interaction and as a process of evolving consciousness. The nursing process is modified by Newman and encompasses nursing diagnosis/intervention based on the unique configuration of each person-environment interaction. Intervention is broadly intepreted as the recognition and augmentation of person-environment patterns, where

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