First Databank Selected as Drug Database Provider for CliniComp, Intl.’s Full-Service EHR Pharmacy Solution

Healthcare industry’s most trusted drug database to drive streamlined inpatient pharmacy workflows for hospitals using CliniComp’s EHR

First Databank, Inc. (FDB), the leading provider of drug and medical device knowledge that helps healthcare professionals make precise decisions, has been selected to supply the drug database for a new and expanded EHR pharmacy module to be offered by CliniComp, Intl., a global provider of hospital-wide clinical documentation systems and electronic health record (EHR) solutions.

CliniComp will integrate the FDB MedKnowledge® database into its EHR to drive a single, full-service pharmacy and medication management system designed to simplify all inpatient pharmacy workflows, including computerized physician order enter (CPOE), medication dispensing and administration.

“Hospitals today need a more robust integrated pharmacy workflow management system within the EHR to make ordering, conflict checking, documenting and dispensing medications easier and more accurate,” said Nancy Pratt, RN, MSN, Senior Vice President Clinical Product Design of CliniComp, Intl. “FDB MedKnowledge will support CliniComp to deliver a more intuitive, easy-to-use solution across all medication workflows, while facilitating meaningful clinical decision support [CDS] alerts, seamless interoperability and smarter data analytics.”

Pratt explained: “We also chose MedKnowledge because the database features excellent organization and structure. This will enable CliniComp to furnish clinicians with access to the right medication information appropriate for their contexts, as well as detailed drug product classifications for more precise selection of drugs.”

Bob Katter, President of FDB, said the alliance will streamline pharmacy workflows to make ordering and dispensing medications more efficient for clinicians. “We will provide CliniComp’s users with meaningful, targeted and actionable medication guidance to support their clinical decision-making,” Katter said. “This will help further improve patient care and safety.”

The new CliniComp pharmacy system powered by FDB MedKnowledge will:

  • Save clinicians time with faster order processing via intelligent dispensing. The system will automate package choice and medication ordering based on criteria such as patient-specific parameters and medication inventory.

  • Save hospitals implementation time via the use of prebuilt medication concepts offered within MedKnowledge. The new full function pharmacy system will provide a foundation from which hospitals can more quickly tailor a solution to meet specific needs.

  • Save hospitals time and resources in updating medication information while ensuring the latest drug data is readily available to clinicians. MedKnowledge will facilitate automated medication updates with minimal post-load maintenance, so there is no downtime.

In addition to FDB MedKnowledge, CliniComp plans to implement the FDB Interoperability Module™ to enhance medication reconciliation and interoperability with external hospital systems, such as automated dispensing cabinets.

About First Databank (FDB)

First Databank (FDB) is the leading provider of drug and medical device knowledge that helps healthcare professionals make precise decisions. We empower our information system developer partners to deliver valuable, useful, and differentiated solutions used by millions of clinicians, business associates, and patients every day. For more than four decades, our medical knowledge has helped improve patient safety, operational efficiency, and healthcare outcomes. For a complete look at our solutions and services, please visit www.fdbhealth.com and follow us on

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Disaster Lit: Database for Disaster Medicine and Public Health

Disaster Lit: Database for Disaster Medicine and Public Health is the National Library of Medicine (NLM) database of links to disaster medicine and public health documents available on the Internet at no cost. Documents include expert guidelines, research reports, conference proceedings, training classes, fact sheets, websites, databases, and similar materials for a professional audience. NLM selects materials from over 1,400 non-commercial publishing sources and supplements disaster-related resources from PubMed (biomedical journal literature) and MedlinePlus (health information for the public).

Read more about Disaster Lit. 

The Help contains tips and guidelines for searching Disaster Lit.

Disaster Lit: Database for Disaster Medicine and Public Health is the National Library of Medicine (NLM) database of links to disaster medicine and public health documents available on the Internet at no cost. Documents include expert guidelines, research reports, conference proceedings, training classes, fact sheets, websites, databases, and similar materials for a professional audience. NLM selects materials from over 1,400 non-commercial publishing sources and supplements disaster-related resources from PubMed (biomedical journal literature) and MedlinePlus (health information for the public).

Read more about Disaster Lit. 

The Help contains tips and guidelines for searching Disaster Lit.

Source Article

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Global Health Expenditure Database



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The Global Health Expenditure Database (GHED) provides internationally comparable data on health spending for close to 190 countries from 2000 to 2017. The database is open access and supports the goal of Universal Health Coverage (UHC) by helping monitor the availability of resources for health and the extent to which they are used efficiently and equitably. This, in turn, helps ensure health services are available and affordable when people need them. In particular, the data published here contributes to a better understanding of:

  • How much do different countries spend on health?
  • How much do different actors such as government, insurance companies, households and donors contribute?
  • What are the financing arrangements to pay for health?
  • How much money is spent on primary health care (PHC)?
  • How much money is spent on different diseases and programmes such as immunization?
  • How much money is spent on the less than 5-year old population?


WHO works collaboratively with Member States and updates the database annually using available data such as health accounts studies and government expenditure records. Where necessary, modifications and estimates are made to ensure the comprehensiveness and consistency of the data across countries and years. GHED is the source of the health expenditure data republished by the World Bank and the WHO Global Health Observatory.

To mark Universal Health Coverage Day in December 2019, WHO has released new data and published the report “Global Spending on Health: A World in Transition”. It examines how countries progress towards financing UHC in a world in transition. It provides an update on the upwards trends in global health spending, confirming the increasing convergence of middle-income countries towards high income countries’ health spending profiles, with increased domestic public spending and the decreasing role of overseas development assistance. The report highlights how most countries who experienced high rates of economic growth also undertook a health financing transition towards increasing the share of health spending funded publicly, while transitioning out from aid is slower. The health financing transition is also accompanied by a transition of institutions with increased pooling and increased subsidization of social insurance mechanisms by public financing. Finally, while there is more and more evidence on the levels of spending on PHC, more analysis is needed to understand how countries ensure adequate financing of the Primary Health Care priority.

Alongside this new report and data, we are also pleased to announce the update of interactive visualisations of health spending for each country. In this section, you will be able to view, download and print individual country profiles.

In the documentation center, you will find the December 2019 country release note, as well as complementary technical notes, methodology guidelines, global, regional and country reports on health expenditure, general information and metadata documents.