Man yanks out two teeth with rusty pliers after he couldn’t book dentist appointment

A desperate man resorted to yanking two of his own teeth out after being unable to book a dentist appointment.

Chris Savage performed the self-dentistry in his bedroom because he could not register with a dentist or book an emergency appointment, saying it was the ‘most horrible thing I’ve ever done.’

The 42 year old said he had been in ‘agony’ for days, saying that just touching the tooth with his rusty pair of pliers set off waves of ‘agonising pain.’

The labourer admitted he had to get ‘very drunk’ by downing eight cans of Stella Artois to mask the pain before he pulled out the first tooth. He then waited another 24 hours to pull the second out – this time sober.

Chris said he was in ‘agony’ for days

Mr Savage, from Southsea in Portsmouth, said: “I ended up having to get very drunk the first time.

“Nobody wants to take part of their own face away with a set of pliers and no real painkillers.

“I put the pliers on my tooth and the second I did that it hurt.

“So I took them away, waited five minutes, built up again and then thought I’ve just got to do it.

Chris used a rusty set of pliers to take the teeth out

“It was a proper yank, a grip and pull – there’s no mucking about once you get to the point it’s started coming out.”

Mr Savage added that though there wasn’t much blood there was ‘enough to be scary’, and that it was ‘worth the risk of infection’.

The father of three didn’t register with an NHS dentist when he moved to Portsmouth from Alton, Hants, three years ago.

The teeth Chris pulled out himself

He lost his two front teeth in a bicycle crash last year, and when he began to experience pain recently he called around 20 dental practices, none of whom were taking on new patients.

He then phoned 111, who directed him to a practice that had volunteered to do triage appointments during the pandemic to help the NHS, but was referred back to 111 when he contacted them.

“It was like a massive game of pass the parcel”, he said.

Mr Savage signed up to receive Universal Credit during lockdown, leaving him with £50 a week for food and bills, meaning he was reluctant to spend the £100 per tooth it would have cost him to have them removed privately.

Chris lost his two front teeth in a bicycle crash last year

He said: “I could’ve waited a week – borrowed money, and had it done in hygienic conditions but there was no way I could’ve waited.

“Hygiene wasn’t going through my head, it was just ‘get this out’ – but the relief was worth it.

“The squelch noise as you pull

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Man who couldn’t see a dentist pulls out own teeth

  • Chris Savage, 42, pulled out two of his own teeth at home in Southsea last week
  • Labourer lost his income during lockdown and couldn’t get a dental appointment
  • Portsmouth South MP called Mr Savage’s case ‘another example of the sad consequences of the Government failing to provide service levels required’ 

A labourer who lost his income during lockdown pulled out two of his own teeth with pliers and downed eight cans of Stella Artois to numb the pain because he couldn’t get a dental appointment due to the coronavirus crisis.

Chris Savage, 42, resorted to yanking two of his own teeth out in his bedroom because he couldn’t register with a dentist or book an emergency appointment, calling last Thursday’s procedure ‘the most horrible thing I’ve ever done’.

He said he had been in ‘agony’ for days, and revealed that just touching the tooth with his rusty pair of pliers set off waves of ‘agonising pain’.

The labourer, from Southsea in Portsmouth, Hampshire, admitted to getting ‘very drunk’ beforehand by downing eight cans of Stella Artois to mask the pain before he pulled out the first tooth. He then waited a day before pulling out the second tooth.

His case has now been raised with the NHS by a health watchdog who said Mr Savage has been ‘severely let down’ by services in the city.

He said: ‘I ended up having to get very drunk the first time. Nobody wants to take part of their own face away with a set of pliers and no real painkillers.

‘I put the pliers on my tooth and the second I did that it hurt. So I took them away, waited five minutes, built up again and then thought I’ve just got to do it.

Chris Savage, 42, resorted to yanking two of his own teeth out in his bedroom because he couldn’t register with a dentist or book an emergency appointment
The labourer said he had been in ‘agony’ for days, and revealed that just touching the tooth with his rusty pair of pliers set off waves of ‘agonising pain’

‘It was a proper yank, a grip and pull — there’s no mucking about once you get to the point it’s started coming out.’

Mr Savage added that though there wasn’t much blood there was ‘enough to be scary’, and that it was ‘worth the risk of infection’.

The father-of-three didn’t register with an NHS dentist when he moved to Portsmouth from Alton three years ago. He lost his two front teeth in a bicycle crash last year, and when he began to experience pain recently he called around 20 dental practices, none of whom were taking on new patients.

He then phoned 111, who directed him to a practice that had volunteered to do triage appointments during the pandemic to help the NHS, but was referred back to 111 when he contacted them.

‘It was like a massive game of pass the parcel’, he said.

Mr Savage signed up to receive

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Coronavirus UK: Man who couldn’t see a dentist pulls out own teeth

A labourer who lost his income during lockdown pulled out two of his own teeth with pliers and downed eight cans of Stella Artois to numb the pain because he couldn’t get a dental appointment due to the coronavirus crisis.

Chris Savage, 42, resorted to yanking two of his own teeth out in his bedroom because he couldn’t register with a dentist or book an emergency appointment, calling last Thursday’s procedure ‘the most horrible thing I’ve ever done’.

He said he had been in ‘agony’ for days, and revealed that just touching the tooth with his rusty pair of pliers set off waves of ‘agonising pain’.

The labourer, from Southsea in Portsmouth, Hampshire, admitted to getting ‘very drunk’ beforehand by downing eight cans of Stella Artois to mask the pain before he pulled out the first tooth. He then waited a day before pulling out the second tooth.

His case has now been raised with the NHS by a health watchdog who said Mr Savage has been ‘severely let down’ by services in the city.

He said: ‘I ended up having to get very drunk the first time. Nobody wants to take part of their own face away with a set of pliers and no real painkillers.

‘I put the pliers on my tooth and the second I did that it hurt. So I took them away, waited five minutes, built up again and then thought I’ve just got to do it.

Chris Savage, 42, resorted to yanking two of his own teeth out in his bedroom because he couldn't register with a dentist or book an emergency appointment

Chris Savage, 42, resorted to yanking two of his own teeth out in his bedroom because he couldn’t register with a dentist or book an emergency appointment

The labourer said he had been in 'agony' for days, and revealed that just touching the tooth with his rusty pair of pliers set off waves of 'agonising pain'

The labourer said he had been in ‘agony’ for days, and revealed that just touching the tooth with his rusty pair of pliers set off waves of ‘agonising pain’

‘It was a proper yank, a grip and pull — there’s no mucking about once you get to the point it’s started coming out.’

Mr Savage added that though there wasn’t much blood there was ‘enough to be scary’, and that it was ‘worth the risk of infection’.

The father-of-three didn’t register with an NHS dentist when he moved to Portsmouth from Alton three years ago. He lost his two front teeth in a bicycle crash last year, and when he began to experience pain recently he called around 20 dental practices, none of whom were taking on new patients.

He then phoned 111, who directed him to a practice that had volunteered to do triage appointments during the pandemic to help the NHS, but was referred back to 111 when he contacted them.

‘It was like a massive game of pass the parcel’, he said.

Mr Savage signed up to receive Universal Credit during lockdown, leaving him with £50 a week for food and bills, meaning he was reluctant to spend the £100 per tooth it would have cost him to have them removed privately.

He said: ‘I could’ve waited a week — borrowed money, and had it done in hygienic

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Portsmouth dad pulled his own teeth out as he couldn’t see dentist

Chris Savage, from Portsmouth, took a pair of pliers to his mouth after local dental practices told him they weren’t taking on any new patients (Picture: Solent News)

A dad who struggled to get a dental appointment during the pandemic had to resort to yanking his own teeth out after downing eight cans of Stella.  

Chris Savage, 42, became desperate after 20 local dental practices told him they weren’t accepting any new NHS patients.

After days in agony he took matters into his own hands but described it as the ‘most horrible thing I’ve ever done.’

Chris, from Southsea, Portsmouth, admitted he had to get ‘very drunk’ by downing eight cans of Stella Artois to mask the pain before he pulled out the first tooth. He then waited another 24 hours to pull the second out – this time sober.

He said: ‘I ended up having to get very drunk the first time. Nobody wants to take part of their own face away with a set of pliers and no real painkillers.

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‘I put the pliers on my tooth and the second I did that it hurt. So I took them away, waited five minutes, built up again and then thought I’ve just got to do it.

‘It was a proper yank, a grip and pull – there’s no mucking about once you get to the point it’s started coming out.’

The father-of-three didn’t register with an NHS dentist when he moved to Portsmouth from Alton, Hampshire, three years ago.

Chris Savage could only perform the emergency surgery on himself after getting drunk (Picture: Portsmouth News/Solent News)

He lost his two front teeth in a bicycle crash last year, and when he began to experience pain recently he called around local practices, none of whom were taking on new patients.

He then phoned 111, who directed him to a practice that had volunteered to do triage appointments during the pandemic to help the NHS, but was referred back to 111 when he contacted them.

‘It was like a massive game of pass the parcel’, he said.

Chris signed up to receive Universal Credit during lockdown after losing work as a self-employed labourer. This left him with £50 a week for food and bills, meaning he was reluctant to spend the £100 per tooth it would have cost him to have them removed privately.

He said: ‘I could’ve waited a week – borrowed money, and had it done in hygienic conditions but there was no way I could’ve waited.

He said it was the ‘most horrible thing I’ve ever done’ (Picture: Portsmouth News/Solent News)

‘Hygiene wasn’t going through my head, it was just “get this out” – but the relief was worth it.

‘The squelch noise as you pull it out is like nothing I’ve ever experienced and I thought “I’ve made a big mistake here”.

‘Then 10 minutes later there was a massive relief, but I couldn’t do that

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I have always had bad bad teeth…. Over the past few months I have had the Iv antibiotics twice due to my dentist

I have always had bad…

I have always had bad bad teeth…. Over the past few months I have had the Iv antibiotics twice due to my dentist saying it was many abscesses and infection that could become life threatening if not treated …. Went from I the hospital began the Iv antibiotics and symptom control but within 24-30 hrs they were like you don’t need antibiotics yes, you need all your teeth pulled and the chronic abscesses could make you I’ll but to basically buck up and deal!!! My dentist once again said it was bad and yes life threatening seeing how the abscesses and infection had gotten into some bone …. I felt completely in the middle …. I am petrified of the dentist and said if I need work done it needs to be under sedation…. Add to the fact that I do not have good vein access at all…. I’ve had to have central lines put in many times when I e needed surgery, during my pregnancies, ect. So, now I sit with one saying you can’t be given sedation …. Sorry, no way in heck I’m going through over 20+ extractions , many are broke off and the remaining is at and below the gum line so those several teeth would have to be cut and dug out as well…… Now within the last 24 hrs I have gotten the worst of any of my tooth/teeth flat ups…. Swelling, gums full of blood and pus, at least 60-70% of the tooth is pure black and you can see the pulp…… I am crying so hard from the pain, it is other wordly …. I would gladly go thru natural childbirth again or my knee replacement 100 honest truth!!!! If I go back to my dentist he’s either gonna say you have to go back ASAP to the hospital for Iv antibiotics and the hospital will bitch and argue and will not put in a central line so no antibiotics or symptom control ….. Or he will say ok, I can’t get a line in you for sedation and I will give you laughing gas ( had it with my deliveries….. Did/does nothing) and give you many shots of numbing med….. Ummmmm, they have sedation dentistry for people like me! Who are scared ( and I’m not a wuss, I can have a central line put in, a knee replacement, natural delivery of twins, a spine tap without making a peep. ! This no way I know it expect now because I am I SO much pain that I can’t talk, swallow, even drink without horrendous pain because of how your tongue automatically pushed against certain teeth…. That light touch hurts so bad it truly makes me want to vomit and scream….. I’m trying not to cry because the pressure just makes it even worse if that’s possible! I never ever thought this type of pain would literally bring me to my knees!!!! To show you
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Baby Teeth- A Parent’s Brief Guide | Dentist Fairfield CA | Mark J. Warner DDS Inc. General Dentistry

Whether this is your first child or your third, it is always nice to know information on your baby. Here are a few facts that are good to know:

1. When your baby is teething , massaging gums, giving them something cold, or even some acetaminophen on occasion can soothe that teething pain. Many times babies don’t have too much discomfort, but sometimes you can really tell your child is in pain. One sign is that they are drooling more than usual. Massaging can offer relief to swollen gums, teething rings that are frozen can also give that relief. If the pain is bad enough, consider consulting with a pediatrician about give the correct dose of acetaminophen to your baby.
2. Most baby teeth start to come in anytime between six and twelve months. All babies are different. Around three months infants become more and more curious about things. Have you noticed they put everything in their mouths?! This makes some parents think their children are teething, but typically the first teeth come in around 6 month. The most common to first appear are the lower front, or the lower central incisors.
3. Once those teeth start coming through, around 6 months, fluoride should be in the child’s diet. This mineral helps prevent tooth decay. Usually it is in tap water, but not all cities have in their water supply, so double check. You can use that tap water in those solid foods like oatmeal, rice, etc.
4. Make an appointment! When that first tooth comes in, it can be an exciting time! Make sure you set an appointment with a pediatric dentist or your dentist so they can give you more detailed advice. This also establishes a pattern for your child, and they may be more likely to not fear going to the dentist if they know it’s normal!

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Dental Implants Restore Your Teeth For Life

DenturesDental implants give you a long-term reason to smile.

With their realistic look and stable support, dental implants are now the preferred dental restoration. However, compared to other treatments, they are still relatively new. Dr. Susan Silvestri and Dr. Ronnie Deninger, dentists in Slidell, Louisiana, have answered a few of the questions they hear from their patients about the efficacy of dental implants. 

The downfalls of dentures…

There was a time not long ago when removable dentures and partials were basically the only tooth replacement available. Dentures developed a reputation of being uncomfortable and artificial-looking, living up to their informal nickname: “false teeth.” Today, many people question the difference in cost between dental implants and dentures.

While it’s true that dentures and partials are usually cheaper, your Slidell dentists will tell you that over time, the cost of dentures may grow. They will need regular maintenance to make sure they continue to fit in your mouth. With the constant removal and cleaning, they are more likely to be accidentally broken and in need of costly repairs. And there are costs involved with the specialized soaking solutions and toothpastes, you must use to keep them clean. They also restrict the foods you can eat comfortably.

…and the improvement of implants!

So while the upfront cost of dental implants may seem expensive, their durability and positive impact on your oral health is invaluable. Once your Slidell dentist has placed the post of the implant, it takes the place of the tooth’s roots, which are essentially in maintaining your jawbone’s integrity. The top of the implant, called the crown, also gives the teeth next to it the support they need to stay in place. Since the implant looks and functions like regular teeth, you can easily eat, talk, and smile without fear of slippage or damage. Regular checkups with your Slidell dentist and good daily oral hygiene are the only maintenance that dental implants need.

With the proper care, your dental implants can last a lifetime with proper care. Start your journey to attractive, comfortable, and effortless dental restoration by calling your Slidell dentist’s office today.

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Can I still go to the dentist? How coronavirus is changing the way we look after our teeth

The coronavirus pandemic is changing the way we access health care, and dental care is no exception.

Dentists are no longer allowed to provide a raft of care, such as regular check-ups and tooth whitening, to minimise the spread of COVID-19. However, if you’re in a lot of pain, your dentist will be able to treat you.

Here’s how the coronavirus is changing the way we look after our teeth.




Read more:
How often should I get my teeth cleaned?


Why are these restrictions in place?

When dentists work on your teeth, they can produce aerosols – droplets or sprays of saliva or blood – in the air.

This happens routinely when your dentist uses a drill or when scaling and polishing, for instance.

And dentists are used to following stringent infection control precautions under normal circumstances to lower the risk of transmission of infectious diseases, whether they are respiratory diseases or blood-borne.

These precautions help keep both patients and dentists safe because it assumes all patients may have an infection, despite the reality that most won’t.

But with the coronavirus pandemic, there is an increased risk of aerosols carrying the virus either directly infecting dental staff, or landing on surfaces, which staff or the next patient can touch.

This transmission may be possible even if you feel perfectly well, as not everyone with the virus has symptoms.

Who’s making these recommendations?

The Australian Health Protection Principal Committee – the key decision-making committee for health emergencies – has recently recommended dentists only provide treatments that do not generate aerosols, or where generating aerosols is limited. And all routine examinations and treatments should be postponed.

This is based on level three restrictions, according to guidance from the Australian Dental Association.

Recommendations of what is and isn’t allowed may change over time.

What does it mean for me? Can I still get a filling?

What’s not allowed?

Non-essential dental care is now postponed. This includes routine check-ups and treatment where there is no pain, bleeding or swelling. So treatments such as whitening and most fillings will have to wait.

Other conditions or treatments that will need to be postponed include:

  • tooth extractions (without accompanied pain or swelling)

  • broken or chipped teeth

  • bleeding or sore gums

  • halitosis (bad breath)

  • loose teeth (that aren’t a choking hazard)

  • concerns about dentures

  • crowns and bridges

  • clicking/grating jaw joint

  • scale and polish

What is allowed?

Some patients will need urgent care for acute problems requiring treatments that produce aerosols. So such procedures have a risk of spreading COVID-19.

Permitted treatments are limited to:

  • tooth extractions or root canal treatment when someone is in acute pain caused by damage to, or death of the nerve in the tooth

  • where upper front teeth are significantly damaged, for example, in an accident (this is an instance where a filling could be provided)

  • management of ulcers or other problems with the lining of the gums and mouth

  • providing care for patients with complex medical conditions and where not treating may lead

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Temecula Dentist Teeth Whitening Dentist -Emergency Dentist Near To Me.

Finding an affordable Temecula dentist is difficult! Dr. Bao is the most affordable dentist in Temecula. He is friendly and professional. It is even more challenging to find an office where you can see the same dentist on every visit. Dr. Bao will be your dentist on every visit so that you can get personalized service. Our friendly and knowledgeable staff understands your dental needs. We are always available if you need an emergency dentist.

$850 Same-Day Crowns*

We provide cutting-edge dentistry that gives our patients more choices. Our technology includes Digital X-rays, digital record keeping, and intraoral photos. We also use CEREC® CAD/CAM restorations same-day crown restorations and more. We will keep your teeth looking their best and be more efficient and accurate with your dental care. Best of all, our affordable prices are the best in Temecula.

$19 Exam and Xrays

We offer comprehensive dental services from cleanings to exams to crowns and braces. Promenade Temecula Dental serves all your dental needs. Our military, trained dentist, has the training to minimize your discomfort. We even provide emergency dentist services. You can see a doctor immediately when you have a dental emergency.

$95 Advanced Teeth Cleaning

Everyone must get their teeth cleaned twice a year to maintain a healthy mouth and gums. Most dentists use old metal tools to scrape your teeth. Not only do they remove plaque but, they remove the enamel. With high-tech ultra-sonic teeth cleaning, we can clean your teeth pain free without removing any enamel. We charge only $95 rather than $199 like most dentists. We are also a high tech teeth whitening dentist. We offer teeth whitening for only $199.

Pain-Free Dentist Near Me

We understand that everyone has a different threshold for pain. If you have had a toothache that’s lasted several days you should find an emergency dentist. The pain could be the result of tooth decay. Even worse would be a dental abscess. Our staff at the Promenade Temecula Dentist can put an end to the pain. It will also help prevent your condition from getting worse.

Emergency Dentist

Our dentist near to me at Promenade Dental Care has many years as a military emergency dentist. As such, he has more experience and training than most dentists. He uses the latest techniques to reattach knocked out teeth, and broken teeth. He can help ease your pain with toothaches or abscessed teeth. We can also assist you with a loose or broken crown. He can usually see you within an hour for emergency dental care.

The sooner you get help for a knocked-out tooth or a broken tooth the more likely Promenade will be able to save it. To improve your chances, preserve your knocked-out tooth in a glass of milk and bring it to our office. For lost dental crowns or dental fillings, use a piece of sugarless gum to fill the gap. Then immediately seek emergency dental care as soon as possible.

Call us for Promenade Temecula Dentist or

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How to Keep Your Teeth Healthy During the COVID-19 Outbreak

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With many dentist offices closed, experts say it’s more important than ever to brush properly and floss regularly. Getty Images
  • Most dentist offices are closed for routine procedures during the COVID-19 outbreak.
  • Dentists are urging people to brush twice a day and floss once a day to take care of their teeth.
  • They say keeping your toothbrush clean is also important for good dental health.

Good dental hygiene might not be in the front of your mind in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic.

That could change quickly if you develop a painful cavity and can’t get in to see a dentist.

“I understand that this isn’t the most normal of times, but it’s very important to control the things we can right now,” H. Dieu Luong, DDS, a New Jersey-based dentist, told Healthline. “On a long list of things in these trying times is oral care.”

Generally speaking, dentists’ advice is to maintain a daily routine of brushing teeth and flossing to prevent tooth decay.

“The main objective is very simple: plaque control,” Daniel Rodda, DDS, owner of Oasis Dental Care in Flagstaff, Arizona, told Healthline.

He advises brushing teeth twice daily and flossing once per day.

“If you haven’t already, make the switch to an electric toothbrush — and brush your teeth for 2 minutes,” Faraj Edher, DDS, a prosthodontist in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, told Healthline. “This has shown to offer the highest levels of oral hygiene, which is crucial at a time when you aren’t seeing your dentist or hygienist for cleanings and checkups.”

Rinsing with a non-alcohol-based mouthwash twice a day also can help reduce plaque buildup leading to inflammation of the gums (gingivitis).

“The oral microbiome is a key component of the immune system,” Mark Burhenne, DDS, founder of AsktheDentist.com, told Healthline. “Mouthwashes high in alcohol or toothpastes with bactericidal components in them, like triclosan or other antibacterial ingredients, can greatly disrupt the health of the oral microbiome.”

“During this time, it’s best not to use any mouthwash or toothpaste that is meant to kill oral bacteria,” Burhenne said. “Your best bet is to use a hydroxyapatite toothpaste, which is less bactericidal than fluoride but rebuilds tooth enamel equally as well.”

Other dentists also recommend the use of fluoride-based toothpaste.

What you eat is also important.

Chris Strandburg, DDS, a spokesperson for Waterpik, advised avoiding excessive snacking — a habit that’s all too easy to adopt when dealing with the stress and boredom inherent in self-quarantining.

“Starchy foods or drinks lead to acid in our mouths, which dissolves tooth surfaces,” Strandburg told Healthline. “The more often our teeth are bathed in these acids, the weaker and softer they become.”

Burhenne also recommended avoiding non-fiber carbohydrates — “which act just like straight sugar and contribute to plaque buildup” — as well as adopting a Paleo-type diet and avoiding processed foods, if possible, to protect oral health.

Good hydration also is important for oral health, dentists agree.

“Resist turning to unhealthy habits to

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