Launch a Global Medical Career with Manipal’s American University of Antigua, College of Medicine

Medical students can be an efficient contingency workforce, provided their lack of training is suitably addressed. Being capable and ready to respond to COVID-19 like pandemic situation needs crucial emphasis on disaster management and emergency medicine. The world is faced with the reality of the shortage of physicians and healthcare providers due to the challenges posed by the current epidemiological peak. From the larger perspective, it is about how the shortage of physicians worldwide is going to impact the global health scenario. A lack of training renders medical students non-essential to patient care; on the other hand, clinical training is essential to generate future responders against COVID-19. What should be the focus of medical institutions and aspiring medical students?

Manipal’s American University of Antigua College of Medicine (AUA) is one such renowned institute in the Caribbean that helps students from different corners of the world to fulfill their dreams of becoming doctors. For nearly two decades, the university is training future physicians and offering a Doctor of Medicine (MD) degree. Gaining Experience in global healthcare is the way forward. AUA provides knowledge on global healthcare through its Global Health Track, which is conducted in collaboration with Florida International University (FIU). The purpose of the Global Health Track is to support and guide students in developing expertise in global health issues with the goal of subsequent career involvement involving patient care, service, policy making, research and education at a global level. 

Not all international medical universities and schools provide the opportunity to practice medicine in the US, Canada, the UK as well as in India. AUA’s curriculum is evaluated regularly to ensure that it is as per the standards of its USA and Canadian counterparts. AUA has collaborations/affiliations with many foreign universities like Florida International University (in the US), The University of Warwick (in the UK), and many others. Surrounded by beautiful nature with warm hospitality received from the people of the Caribbean region, AUA surely stands out to be a place to build a career in medicine and more than 3,000 students of AUA have graduated and are practicing in the US, Canada and the UK.

Manipal’s AUA emphasizes the need for well-rounded doctors. Hence, equal importance is given to the academic performance as well as emotional intelligence. The admission process is holistic that considers more than just the test scores

Alumnus Dr. Nandita Mahajan shares, “If anyone is planning to go for higher education in medicine, they should choose to go to AUA.”

The alumni of Manipal’s AUA stand testimonial to the difference being made by this institution in India as well as India’s contribution to global healthcare. The choice is usually driven by: greener pastures, studying abroad, acquiring a mere medical degree or contributing towards the larger purpose of improving the global healthcare scenario. 

Another alumnus Dr. Nandini Chattopadhyay reminisces, “The teaching that one receives in pre-clinical sciences in AUA, lay the foundation for clinical sciences. Everybody in AUA is always eager to help in

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Coronavirus declared global health emergency by WHO

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Media captionDr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus: “We must all act together now to limit further spread”

The new coronavirus has been declared a global emergency by the World Health Organization, as the outbreak continues to spread outside China.

“The main reason for this declaration is not what is happening in China but what is happening in other countries,” said WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.

The concern is that it could spread to countries with weaker health systems.

Meanwhile, the US has told its citizens not to travel to China.

The state department issued a level four warning – having previously urged Americans to “reconsider” travel to China – and said any citizens in China “should consider departing using commercial means”.

China has said it will send charter plans to bring back Hubei province residents who are overseas “as soon as possible”.

A foreign ministry spokesman said this was because of the “practical difficulties” Chinese citizens have faced abroad. Hubei is where the virus emerged.

At least 213 people in the China have died from the virus, mostly in Hubei, with almost 10,000 cases nationally.

  • US advises against all travel to China over virus
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The WHO said there had been 98 cases in 18 other countries, but no deaths.

Most international cases are in people who had been to Wuhan in Hubei.

However in eight cases – in Germany, Japan, Vietnam and the United States – patients were infected by people who had travelled to China.

People wearing masks

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Coronavirus outbreak outside ChinaSource: WHO and local authorities

Speaking at a news conference in Geneva, Dr Tedros described the virus as an “unprecedented outbreak” that has been met with an “unprecedented response”.

He praised the “extraordinary measures” Chinese authorities had taken, and said there was no reason to limit trade or travel to China.

  • Trump official: Coronavirus may boost US jobs
  • Britons on evacuation flight home from Wuhan

“Let me be clear, this declaration is not a vote of no confidence in China,” he said.

But various countries have taken steps to close borders or cancel flights, and companies like Google, Ikea, Starbucks and Tesla have closed their shops or stopped operations.

The US Commerce Secretary, Wilbur Ross, has said the outbreak could “accelerate the return of jobs to North America”.

Preparing other countries

What happens if this virus finds its way into a country that cannot cope?

Many low- and middle-income countries simply lack the tools to spot or contain it. The fear is it could spread uncontrollably and that it may go unnoticed for some time.

Remember this is a disease which emerged only last month – and yet there are already almost 10,000 confirmed cases in China.

The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa – the largest in human history – showed how easily poorer countries can be overwhelmed by such outbreaks.

And if novel coronavirus gets a significant foothold in such places, then it would

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Certificate 3 in Fitness | Global Fitness Institute

Description

Certificate 3 in Fitness

certificate 3 in fitness

The Certificate 3 in Fitness is the basic entry level fitness courses for those looking to become a fitness instructor.

Our delivery mode includes the flexibility of online theory content, videos, online support and face-to-face practical training.

Students are able to book in a time with a tutor to assist with theory modules. When it is time for prac, students book in for a training or assessment session with one of our expert staff.

A certified fitness instructor may be employed in locations such as gyms, fitness facilities, pools and community facilities.

Graduates of the Global Fitness Institute SIS30315 Certificate 3 in Fitness will possess the appropriate industry recognized trainer qualification to work as a gym instructor or group fitness instructor.

Already Working in the Industry ? Apply for Recognition of Prior Learning

Unsure if you qualify for RPL, more info here

Students will complete the following core units, developing skills and knowledge, such as the ability to :

  • SISFFIT001 Provide Health Screening and Fitness Orientation
  • SISFFIT002 Recognise and apply exercise considerations for specific populations
  • SISFFIT003 Instruct fitness programs
  • SISFFIT004 Incorporate anatomy and physiology principles into fitness programming
  • SISFFIT005 Provide healthy eating information
  • SISFFIT014 Instruct exercise to older clients
  • SISXCCS001 Provide quality service
  • SISXFAC001 Maintain equipment for activities
  • SISXIND001 Work effectively in sport, fitness and recreation environments

These core units form the entry level requirements to enrol into our Personal Training Courses (Certificate IV in Fitness)

Additional units :

  • HLTAID003 Provide first aid
  • BSBRSK401 Identify risk and apply risk management processes
  • HLTWHS001 Participate in workplace health and safety
  • SISFFIT006 Conduct fitness appraisals
  • SISXCAI006 Facilitate Groups
  • SISFFIT007 Instruct group exercise sessions
  • SISXFAC002 Maintain sport, fitness and recreation facilities

 

Training Package specifications

Qualification Description

This qualification reflects the role of instructors who perform a range of activities and functions within the fitness industry. Depending on the specialisation chosen, this qualification provides a pathway to work as an instructor providing exercise instruction for group, aqua or gym programs.

They work independently with some level of autonomy in a controlled environment such as fitness, leisure, aquatic and community centres where risks are managed through pre-existing risk assessment and hazard control processes.

Individuals who specialise in Group Exercise Instruction deliver exercise sessions designed for participation by a group of clients with a mix of ages/fitness levels. Sessions may be freestyle, pre-choreographed or circuit style. These individuals instruct and demonstrate complete exercise sessions to groups with limited individual interaction.

Individuals who specialise in Gym Instruction provide individually tailored client assessments, provide technique correction as needed, and develop and demonstrate programs. They also provide supervision of a facility or service, keep equipment clean, tidy and well maintained, and handle various customer inquiries.

No occupational licensing, certification or specific legislative requirements apply to this qualification at the time of publication.

Entry Requirements

There are no entry requirements for this qualification.

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Global Health Expenditure Database



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The Global Health Expenditure Database (GHED) provides internationally comparable data on health spending for close to 190 countries from 2000 to 2017. The database is open access and supports the goal of Universal Health Coverage (UHC) by helping monitor the availability of resources for health and the extent to which they are used efficiently and equitably. This, in turn, helps ensure health services are available and affordable when people need them. In particular, the data published here contributes to a better understanding of:

  • How much do different countries spend on health?
  • How much do different actors such as government, insurance companies, households and donors contribute?
  • What are the financing arrangements to pay for health?
  • How much money is spent on primary health care (PHC)?
  • How much money is spent on different diseases and programmes such as immunization?
  • How much money is spent on the less than 5-year old population?


WHO works collaboratively with Member States and updates the database annually using available data such as health accounts studies and government expenditure records. Where necessary, modifications and estimates are made to ensure the comprehensiveness and consistency of the data across countries and years. GHED is the source of the health expenditure data republished by the World Bank and the WHO Global Health Observatory.

To mark Universal Health Coverage Day in December 2019, WHO has released new data and published the report “Global Spending on Health: A World in Transition”. It examines how countries progress towards financing UHC in a world in transition. It provides an update on the upwards trends in global health spending, confirming the increasing convergence of middle-income countries towards high income countries’ health spending profiles, with increased domestic public spending and the decreasing role of overseas development assistance. The report highlights how most countries who experienced high rates of economic growth also undertook a health financing transition towards increasing the share of health spending funded publicly, while transitioning out from aid is slower. The health financing transition is also accompanied by a transition of institutions with increased pooling and increased subsidization of social insurance mechanisms by public financing. Finally, while there is more and more evidence on the levels of spending on PHC, more analysis is needed to understand how countries ensure adequate financing of the Primary Health Care priority.

Alongside this new report and data, we are also pleased to announce the update of interactive visualisations of health spending for each country. In this section, you will be able to view, download and print individual country profiles.

In the documentation center, you will find the December 2019 country release note, as well as complementary technical notes, methodology guidelines, global, regional and country reports on health expenditure, general information and metadata documents.