Health officials warn against Mother’s Day gatherings while modeling projects more US deaths than expected

“As a result, COVID-19 spread among attendees. Remember, the best way to celebrate #MothersDay and any other occasion is by STAYING HOME and staying healthy”

Louisiana health officials suggested safe alternatives, like having a virtual brunch together.

For those still planning to see their mothers in person, “Resist the temptation to hug your mom and maintain six feet of separation,” the Louisiana Department of Public Health said.
Older adults have the highest risk of severe complications or death from coronavirus. And the numbers of cases and deaths keep rising.
By Sunday, more than 1,320,000 people in the US have been infected, and more than 79,000 have died, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

‘Explosive increases in mobility’ leads to more projected deaths

A projection model cited by the White House now predicts thousands more deaths, largely due to “explosive increases in mobility in a number of states.”

The model, from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, now forecasts 137,000 deaths in the United States by August, up from an earlier prediction of about 134,000.
Pew Research Poll: Two-thirds of Americans are concerned states will lift restrictions too quickly

IHME Director Dr. Christopher Murray said cell phone data shows Americans are moving more, suggesting more infections to come.

“We’re seeing just explosive increases in mobility in a number of states that we expect will translate into more cases and deaths in 10 days from now,” Murray told CBS’ “Face the Nation” on Sunday.

“What’s driving the change is, simply put, the rise in mobility,” Murray said. “We’re seeing in some states a 20 percentage point increase in just 10 days in mobility. And that will translate into more human contact, more transmission.”

He said the top five states that have seen increased mobility are Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota and Georgia.

Other states have seen a 15-20 percentage point increase in mobility, according to an IHME press release: Alabama, Alaska, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

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But as unemployment rates soar, governors are starting to reopen more businesses — even though many have not yet met all of the White House’s guidelines on when to safely do so.
Most states have eased restrictions. See where your state stands
And public health experts have said there’s still not enough testing or contact tracing to safely reopen the country.
But no one will know the health effects of each state’s reopening for weeks.
“It will be at least two to three weeks before we see an increase in the number of infections because it takes time for individuals to infect others and for them to display symptoms,” said data scientist Youyang Gu, whose coronavirus projection model is cited by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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For those who might succumb to new infections, “around three weeks is the average time between infection to death,” said Gu, citing studies from Italy and China.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has said if measures are lifted
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