Dentist Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta Explains the Field’s Most Common Area of Practice, Centered Around Preventive and Restorative Care

ATLANTA, GA / ACCESSWIRE / October 9, 2020 / Focused on preventive and restorative services intended to promote optimum oral health, general dentists make up more than two-thirds of the profession. A popular dentist based in the so-called Peach State of Georgia, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta explains more about the field.

“Often I’m asked, ‘What is general dentistry?'” saysDr. Frank Roach Atlanta, speaking from his office in the Gwinnett County city of Norcross.

According to Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta, as many as 80 percent of all qualified individuals-those using their dental degree in some fashion-in the United States are considered general dentists. “Distinct from those who are focused primarily on one area of dental practice, such as periodontics, general dentists handle an array of different services, vital to the continued oral health of their patients,” he explains.

The general dentistry field,Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta goes on to illustrate, primarily covers preventive and restorative services. “General dentists may also take care of cosmetic procedures,” adds the expert, “as well as overall health concerns, such as in the case of obstructive sleep apnea.”

For many people, the one healthcare provider that they see more than any other is their dentist. Invariably, this will be a general dentist, says Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta. “As general dentists, we are the primary providers of dental care to patients of all ages,” he points out.

Routine visits,Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta suggests, to a family dentist, are the most common occurrence in a general dentistry practice, followed by professional cleaning, and, in the presence of decay, the process of filling an affected tooth.

The majority of patients are advised, Dr. Roach says, to visit their dentist at regular intervals to keep their pearly whites in tip-top condition. “Anywhere from quarterly to once or twice per year should be the norm for a typical patient,” proposesDr. Frank Roach Atlanta, “although a quick conversation with your chosen dentist will provide a more concrete idea.”

All general dentists, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta reports, have successfully completed four years of education at an accredited dental school. “They will also have fulfilled the requirements of their local state licensing board,” he explains, “including testing and, in some instances, continuing education.”

Proudly practicing dentistry for more than two decades, Dr. Frank Roach is based in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta metropolitan statistical area city of Norcross. Norcross, in turn, is located in Gwinnett County – a suburban county of Atlanta in the north-central portion of Georgia. Home to almost a million people, Gwinnett County is the second-most populous in the so-called Peach State after Fulton County.

In addition to general dentistry,Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta also focuses on dental implants, veneers, and teeth whitening, among a number of other services. In his spare time, Dr. Roach is a keen scuba diver, an avid tennis player, and is the proud guardian of his 100-pound canine companion, American pit bull terrier Elvis.

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SOURCE: Dr. Frank Roach

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dentistry | Definition, History, & Fields

Early dentistry

Dentistry, in some form, has been practiced since ancient times. For example, Egyptian skulls dating from 2900 to 2750 bce contain evidence of small holes in the jaw in the vicinity of a tooth’s roots. Such holes are believed to have been drilled to drain abscesses. In addition, accounts of dental treatment appear in Egyptian scrolls dating from 1500 bce. It is thought that the Egyptians practiced oral surgery perhaps as early as 2500 bce, although evidence for this is minimal. An early attempt at tooth replacement dates to Phoenicia (modern Lebanon) around 600 bce, where missing teeth were replaced with animal teeth and were bound into place with cord.

True restorative dentistry began with the Etruscans, who lived in the area of what is today central and northern Italy. Numerous dental bridges and partial dentures of gold have been found in Etruscan tombs, which date to about 500 bce. The Romans, who conquered the Etruscans, adopted Etruscan culture, and dentistry became a regular part of Roman medical practice. The Greeks also practiced some form of oral medicine, including tooth extractions, from the time of Hippocrates, around 400 bce.

In the Eastern world, dentistry had a totally different history. There is evidence that the early Chinese practiced some restorative dentistry as early as the year 200 bce, using silver amalgam as fillings. Oral medicine was part of the regular medical practice in other early Asian civilizations, such as those in India and Japan.

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Because of the proscription in the Qurʾan, the sacred scripture of Islam, against mutilating the body, surgery was not practiced in Islamic countries. Instead, reliance was placed upon healing through the use of herbs and medicines; preventive dentistry through strict adherence to oral hygiene became paramount. The writings of early Arabic physicians, such as Avicenna and Abū al-Qāsim, show that scaling and cleaning of teeth were practiced. Extractions were rare and were performed only when a tooth had been loosened.

Development of dentistry in Europe

With the demise of the western Roman Empire about the year 475 ce, medicine in Europe declined into a torpor that would last for almost a thousand years. About the only places where medicine or surgery was practiced were monasteries, and monks were aided in their surgical ministrations by the local barbers, who went to the monasteries to cut the monks’ hair and shave the monks’ beards. In 1163 a church council at Tours, France, ordered that henceforth no monks or priests were to practice any surgery, since it was felt that the shedding of blood was incompatible with the holy office of the clergy. Thus, the only people who had any rudimentary knowledge of surgery were the barbers, and they stepped into the breach, calling themselves barber-surgeons. They practiced simple dentistry, including extractions and cleaning of teeth. In the 1600s a number of barber-surgeons began restricting their

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medicine | Definition, Fields, Research, & Facts

Medicine, the practice concerned with the maintenance of health and the prevention, alleviation, or cure of disease.

The World Health Organization at its 1978 international conference held in the Soviet Union produced the Alma-Ata Health Declaration, which was designed to serve governments as a basis for planning health care that would reach people at all levels of society. The declaration reaffirmed that

health, which is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, is a fundamental human right and that the attainment of the highest possible level of health is a most important world-wide social goal whose realization requires the action of many other social and economic sectors in addition to the health sector.

In its widest form, the practice of medicine—that is to say, the promotion and care of health—is concerned with this ideal.

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Organization of health services

It is generally the goal of most countries to have their health services organized in such a way to ensure that individuals, families, and communities obtain the maximum benefit from current knowledge and technology available for the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health. In order to play their part in this process, governments and other agencies are faced with numerous tasks, including the following: (1) They must obtain as much information as is possible on the size, extent, and urgency of their needs; without accurate information, planning can be misdirected. (2) These needs must then be revised against the resources likely to be available in terms of money, manpower, and materials; developing countries may well require external aid to supplement their own resources. (3) Based on their assessments, countries then need to determine realistic objectives and draw up plans. (4) Finally, a process of evaluation needs to be built into the program; the lack of reliable information and accurate assessment can lead to confusion, waste, and inefficiency.

Health services of any nature reflect a number of interrelated characteristics, among which the most obvious, but not necessarily the most important from a national point of view, is the curative function; that is to say, caring for those already ill. Others include special services that deal with particular groups (such as children or pregnant women) and with specific needs such as nutrition or immunization; preventive services, the protection of the health both of individuals and of communities; health education; and, as mentioned above, the collection and analysis of information.

Levels of health care

In the curative domain there are various forms of medical practice. They may be thought of generally as forming a pyramidal structure, with three tiers representing increasing degrees of specialization and technical sophistication but catering to diminishing numbers of patients as they are filtered out of the system at a lower level. Only those patients who require special attention either for diagnosis or treatment should reach the

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What is medicine? Definition, fields, and branches

Medicine is the field of health and healing. It includes nurses, doctors, and various specialists. It covers diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease, medical research, and many other aspects of health.

Medicine aims to promote and maintain health and wellbeing.

Conventional modern medicine is sometimes called allopathic medicine. It involves the use of drugs or surgery, often supported by counseling and lifestyle measures.

Alternative and complementary types of medicine include acupuncture, homeopathy, herbal medicine, art therapy, traditional Chinese medicine, and many more.

Modern medicine has many fields and aspects. Here are some of them.

Clinical practice

A clinician is a health worker who works directly with patients in a hospital or other healthcare setting. Nurses, doctors, psychotherapists, and other specialists are all clinicians.

Not all medical specialists are clinicians. Researchers and laboratory workers are not clinicians because they do not work with patients.

The physician assesses the individual, with the aim of diagnosing, treating, and preventing disease using knowledge learned from training, research, and experiences, and clinical judgment.

Biomedical research

This area of science seeks ways to prevent and treat diseases that lead to illness or death.

Biomedical scientists use biotechnology techniques to study biological processes and diseases. They aim to develop successful treatments and cures.

Biomedical research requires careful experimentation, development, and evaluation. It involves biologists, chemists, doctors, pharmacologists, and others.

Medications

This field looks at drugs or medicines and how to use them.

Doctors and other health professionals use medications in the medical diagnosis, treatment, cure, and prevention of disease.

Surgery

Surgical procedures are necessary for diagnosing and treating some types of disease, malfomation, and injury. They use instrumental and manual means rather than medication.

A surgeon may carry out a surgical procedure to remove or replace diseased tissue or organs, or they may use surgery to remove tissue for biopsy. Sometimes, they remove unwanted tissue and then send it for diagnosis.

Medical devices

Health professionals use a wide range of instruments to diagnose and treat a disease or other condition, to prevent a worsening of symptoms, to replace a damaged part — such as a hip or a knee — and so on.

Medical devices range from test tubes to sophisticated scanning machines.

Alternative and complementary medicine

This includes any practice that aims to heal but is not part of conventional medicine. Techniques range widely. They include the use of herbs, manipulation of “channels” in the body, relaxation, and so on.

Alternative and complementary do not have the same meaning:

Alternative medicine: People use a different option from the conventional one, such as using relaxation measures to improve headaches, rather than pain relief medication.

Complementary medicine: People add another treatment option to a main treatment. For example, they may use relaxation as well as pain relief medication for a headache.

Alternative and complementary therapies are often based on traditional knowledge, rather than scientific evidence or clinical trials.

Examples include homeopathy, acupuncture, ayurveda, naturopathic medicine, and traditional Chinese medicine.

Clinical research

Researchers carry out investigations to

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