UW Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Seattle WA –

Northwest Center for Oral and Facial Surgery


Dentistry faculty helps rebuild jaw and palate in rare procedure

front and side scan of patientJune 3, 2016 – A team of University of Washington surgeons, including two School of Dentistry faculty members, has rebuilt a patient’s upper jaw and hard palate in one day in a rare procedure that utilized three-dimensional computerized design and implant-bone integration technology.

BREAKTHROUGHS


OMS Newsletter – December 2018 (PDF)


Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMS) is a specialty of medicine and dentistry that focuses on the diagnosis, surgical treatment, and management of diseases and disorders of the face and jaws. Our faculty are trained to treat trauma, congenital and acquired defects and disorders, facial infections, cancers of the head and neck region, as well as to perform extractions, placement of dental implants, and dental anesthesia and sedation. The Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery conducts  predoctoral curriculum in OMS, a 6-year MD/OMS-Certificate Residency Program, and a 1-year, hospital based, General Practice Residency (GPR).

The primary objective of the undergraduate curriculum is to provide didactic and clinical training in routine dentoalveolar surgery, management of medically compromised patients, local anesthesia and sedation, and pain control. The 6-year OMS Residency Program is designed to meet the certification requirements of the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, and includes integrated didactic and clinical instruction in oral and maxillofacial surgery, medicine, general surgery, anesthesia, anatomy, and pathology. The 1-year General Practice Residency Program (with a second year option) is designed to provide advanced training in all areas of dentistry in order to enhance the skills acquired during predoctoral education. These objectives are achieved by integrating a unique clinical and didactic program only available through a dental school/hospital based program.

The guiding principles of our programs include compassion, respect and regard for the inherent dignity of patients, high moral and ethical standards, commitment to evidence-based clinical practice, and technical excellence in the full scope of the profession.

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Family Medicine Department | Ohio State Medical Center

Recognized for outstanding clinical, educational and research initiatives in family health

The Department of Family Medicine offers patient-centered personalized medical services through The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center at locations throughout Columbus and Franklin County. Teams of physicians, residents, nurse care coordinators, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, dietitians, medical assistants/technicians and mental health experts work together to ensure that our patients receive excellent, personalized healthcare.

Family medicine offers a wide-range of team-based services, including physical examinations, wellness care, pediatric services, care for sports-related injuries, women’s healthcare, acute care and chronic disease management, family and marital counseling, psychological services, minor surgery, care coordination, dietitian nutritional services, pharmacist medication review and much more. In addition, as part of one of the nation’s top-ranked medical centers, the Department of Family Medicine has access to nationally and internationally recognized specialists and support services.

As leaders in patient-centered, team-based care, our family medicine offices are all accepted at the highest level of Patient-Centered Medical Home recognition by the National Committee on Quality Assurance. In addition, all of our offices were chosen to participate in Comprehensive Primary Care, which is a national advanced primary care medical home model of care. Our physicians are part of 13,090 (of more than 209,000) clinicians nationwide to obtain this designation.

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Utah Department of Health

For the most current information about Coronavirus, go to coronavirus.utah.gov.

If you’re worried about whether you may have COVID-19, please call the Utah Coronavirus Information Line at 1-800-456-7707.

Si está preocupado de que tal vez pueda tener COVID-19, llame a la línea de información del Coronavirus de Utah 1-800-456-7707.

For language materials and resources visit our Coronavirus page.

Join us in helping all Utahns reach their highest health potential

The Office of Health Disparities (OHD) is committed to a vision where all people have a fair opportunity to reach their highest health potential given that health is crucial for well-being, longevity, and economic and social mobility.

You will find:

It Takes a Village Giving Our Babies the Best Chance Logo

The It Takes A Village: Giving Our Babies the Best Chance program is an ongoing effort by the Utah Department of Health Office of Health Disparities (OHD) to address birth outcomes among Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander communities. OHD has developed a culturally relevant curriculum aimed at creating healthier communities and babies. The new curriculum has been released . Check it out and start a group near you.

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Internal Medicine Department | Ohio State College of Medicine

Voted “Among America’s Best” in Healthcare

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center’s Department of Internal Medicine is the largest department in one of the nation’s leading academic medical centers and is comprised of 15 specialty divisions.

The department has been recognized by U.S. News & World Report in multiple areas. While seven programs at OSUWMC were identified by this report, five of these programs are within internal medicine and are among the best in the country, including cancer, heart disease, kidney disease, diabetes and endocrine disorders and pulmonary and geriatrics. The department’s gastroenterology and geriatrics programs were also recognized as high performing.

The Internal Medicine Residency Training Program is one of 21 institutions recognized for innovation in training the next generation of internists. Our designation as an Educational Innovation Project places us in the top five percent of training programs in internal medicine. The focus of our educational innovation effort includes verifying competency, emphasizing team work in mastering skills, transition of care, linking educational and clinical quality improvement.

Our Mission

The mission of the Department of Internal Medicine is to improve the lives of people through innovation in research, education and patient care. Our vision is that in working as a team we will shape the future of medicine by creating, disseminating and applying new knowledge to meet the needs of each individual.

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Florida Department of Health in Escambia

Hepatitis A is a vaccine-preventable liver disease. While normally not fatal, persons with chronic liver or kidney disease or compromised immune systems are more likely to experience a severe illness, leading to liver failure and possible death.

The symptoms of hepatitis A can include: fever, jaundice (yellow skin and eyes), tiredness, loss of appetite, vomiting, abdominal pain, dark urine, diarrhea, and gray clay-colored stool. If you have symptoms of hepatitis A, you should visit your health care provider for evaluation. People that are exposed to hepatitis A may be given vaccine or immune globulin within 14 days of exposure to prevent infection.


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Home Page | the Department of Anesthesiology

“Ronald K. Baker PhD, MD was a resident in the Department of Anesthesiology at the University of Arizona in the late 70s when I was a junior faculty member. We did many cases together, and I remember him well, and fondly, as an excellent resident and physician, always on top of things. He had an engaging personality, scraggly mustache, and a wry (sometimes smirky) smile and sense of humor. Like me, he was a bit quirky, with esoteric interests (I wasn’t surprised to learn he cared for distressed ferrets). He had excellent hands for procedures, but roughly hewn, as if he worked on cars or other labor-intensive hobbies in his spare time. 

He had been a chemist and I queried him about van der Waals forces, the subtle quantum interactions by which anesthetic gases erase consciousness, still mysterious to this day. Favoring true ‘chemical’ bonds, Ron disdained the weak and evanescent quantum forces, and we debated their importance. I pressed him about microtubules inside neurons, which I believed (and still believe) mediate consciousness and anesthetic action. At that, Ron just smiled and smirked even more wryly. 

The Department was new, having been a Division of Surgery until the mid 70s, and led by its founding Chairman, Burnell R. Brown Jr. PhD, MD. Like me, Ron had been recruited into Anesthesiology through Burnell’s broad-based intellect, humor and passion about the future of the field. Burnell joined in our discussions about anesthetic action, chemistry and physics, and a broad range of other topics, often between cases in the ‘doctor’s lounge’, literally a smoke-filled room with a large, central ash tray (how times have changed!). The field of Anesthesiology was also new, emerging from its role as ‘surgeon’s handmaiden’ into a specialty of its own. Our tools were primitive, before the days of pulse oximetry, capnography, automatic blood pressure cuffs, propofol, LMAs, ultrasound and ventilators. We spent much of our intra-operative time squeezing the ventilation bag and blood pressure cuff bulbs, a finger on the pulse, and an eye on the color of the lips and tongue. 

I lost touch with Ron after his residency, but from what I’ve read, he had a happy and successful life and career in Colorado. I imagine he adapted well to the many advances in Anesthesiology, but presumed he remained, like me, ‘old school’ at heart.

Ron passed away in 2017 and generously bequeathed 8.8 million dollars to the University of Arizona College of Medicine and Department of Anesthesiology. 

Thanks Ron”

– Dr. Stuart Hameroff, MD

New location for Department of Anesthesiology

The Department of Anesthesiology moved into its new operating rooms on Monday April 9th that are located on the 3rd floor of the recently dedicated Tower 1, a 9 story, 670,000 square foot hospital, part of the Banner University Medical Center Tucson expansion project. The new peri-operative space includes 22 state of the art operating rooms, including 2 hybrid ORs, dedicated regional block and procedure rooms, office space for the Board Runner, Peri-Operative Medical Director

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Why is Calcium Important | Department of Medicine

Calcium is important for overall health. Almost every cell in our body uses calcium in some way. Some areas where our bodies use calcium is in our nervous system, muscles, heart and bone. Our bones store calcium in addition to providing support for our bodies. As we age, we absorb less and less calcium from our diet, causing our bodies to take more and more calcium from our bones. Over time this aging process can cause or contribute to osteopenia or osteoporosis.

MilkWe get calcium from the food we eat. Calcium-rich foods include milk, cheeses and other dairy products. We can also get calcium from vitamins and supplements.

X-rayOur bodies like to keep the amount of calcium in our blood within a certain narrow range. This range allows the cells in our body to stay healthy and perform jobs necessary for life. When blood calcium levels are low the amount of calcium in our blood goes below normal, our parathyroid glands release a hormone called parathyroid hormone (PTH). Although this sounds similar to thyroid hormone, PTH is different. PTH tells our bones to release more calcium into the blood stream. PTH also helps activate vitamin D which in turn increases intestinal calcium absorbtion.

SunWe obtain vitamin D from the foods we eat and from our skin in response to sunlight. Because vitamin D promotes absorption of calcium from the intestine,vitamin D helps to build and maintain strong bones. When we have very low vitamin D levels, we can develop an adult form of rickets, called osteomalacia.

 

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Florida Department of Health in Marion

OCALA, Fla.—Even though we are surrounded by COVID-19 news, many may not be aware of how COVID-19 is impacting Marion and what testing and response efforts look like locally. To help address this, the Department of Health in Marion County (DOH-Marion) is providing answers to some frequently asked questions. 

What is DOH-Marion’s role in COVID-19 response?

DOH-Marion is involved in several key aspects of COVID-19 response. Primarily, the department is focused on testing, protecting the elderly and vulnerable, preparing for medical surge, and educating the public on ways to prevent the spread of the virus.

DOH-Marion tests for COVID-19 daily and works to help expand access to local testing. This means providing drive-up testing by appointment at the department, working with Ocala Fire Rescue to help test individuals who are not able to drive to the facility and coordinating with other local medical facilities to best direct individuals who may need testing.

 

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Home | Department of Medicine

Message from the Chair

Dr, Brian Reeves, NephrologyWelcome to the Department of Medicine at the UT Health San Antonio.

The Department of Medicine is the largest department in the School of Medicine and is committed to excellence in clinical care, education and research.

At UT Health San Antonio, “We Make Lives Better” and this vision is embodied in our Department Mission statement:
• Improve the health of our patients and the community through the discovery and implementation of high value, evidence-based, patient-centered treatment and prevention programs.
• Advance health care for the future by preparing health care providers for life-long learning, translating basic research into clinical practice and redesigning health care delivery to promote population health.
• Promote the growth and success of the School and University through interdisciplinary collaborations in research, integration of clinical care and interprofessional education programs.
• Enhance the lives of our faculty and staff by providing a workplace which encourages personal and professional development, celebrates diversity and rewards the contributions of each employee.

Our Department is comprised of 12 divisions, each offering expert clinical care and outstanding training programs. You can learn more about each division by visiting their web pages, listed to the left. Inpatient care and training are provided at our two main teaching hospitals, the University Hospital and the Audie Murphy VA Medical Center. Outpatient care and training are offered at the UTMed outpatient facility (MARC), our new Hill Country clinic, the UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center, the VA Medical Center and at clinics operated by the University Health System. Some divisions also sponsor joint training programs with our colleagues at the San Antonio Military Medical Center, the busiest medical facility in the Department of Defense. The Internal Medicine residency program includes over 100 residents and boasts a first-time ABIM pass rate of over 95%.

Cutting-edge research is conducted by our faculty, trainees and staff. Although our research involves all disciplines, there is particular strength in diabetes, kidney disease, cancer, aging, infectious disease and health services research. UTHSA is the proud home of an NIH-CTSA, Claude Pepper Center Older Americans Independence Center, Nathan Shock Center and a VA Geriatrics Education Research and Clinical Center and Department of Medicine faculty have leadership roles in each. The Department is embarking on a major expansion of its research programs with increased infrastructure, laboratory renovations and targeted recruitments.

San Antonio is a wonderful place to live and to work. The 7th largest city in the US, it offers the many attractions and opportunities expected of a metropolis but without the usual congestion and high cost of living. San Antonio has been ranked as one of the most livable cities in the US and is a very popular destination for visitors and retirees. There are many recreational activities in San Antonio and the surrounding Texas Hill Country, including the scenic downtown Riverwalk, the historic Alamo, the newly revitalized Pearl Brewery district, Six Flags and Sea World, rafting on the Guadalupe River, great shopping and great food.

Thank

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Division of Hematology and Oncology: Department of Medicine: Feinberg School of Medicine: Northwestern University

The Division of Hematology and Oncology is focused on improving patients’ therapeutic options and quality of life while working to better prevent, diagnose and treat cancer and hematologic disorders.

“Our division houses laboratory-based investigators focused on a broad array of topics, including chemoprevention, cell signal pathways, epigenetics, immune-modulation, and nanotechnology theranostics.”

– William J. Gradishar, MD

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What We Do

Faculty: Meet the Team

View individual profiles of our faculty members and learn about their research and clinical specialties.




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Ami N Shah

Assistant Professor of Medicine (Hematology and Oncology)

I am dedicated to providing the high-quality and compassionate care for patients with breast cancer. I am interested in clinical research with a focus on developing clinical trials of novel agents for the treatment of all stages of breast cancer and investigating biomarkers to guide therapy decisions.

Bin Zhang

Professor of Medicine (Hematology and Oncology) and Microbiology-Immunology

Cancer immunology and immunotherapy. The Zhang laboratory functions as an integrated translational research program with the goal of designing and developing new immunotherapies and immunologic strategies for cancer treatment. The ongoing projects are focused on dissecting the molecular mechanisms used for tumor immune evasion based on the cutting-edge technical platforms.

Huiping Liu

Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Medicine (Hematology and Oncology)

The Liu lab studies the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer stem cells (CSCs) and metastasis through four ongoing interactive basic and translational research projects: (1) to understand CSCs in metastasis using cutting-edge single cell sequencing and CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technologies; (2) to image CSC behavior and interactions with immune cells during metastasis using bioluminescence imaging and intravital imaging systems; (3) to target CSCs with novel therapeutics delivered by exosomes and nanoparticles; (4) to develop circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating exosome-based bioma…

Jindan Yu

Professor of Medicine (Hematology and Oncology) and Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics

The primary research focus of the lab is to understand aberrant transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of prostate cancer. We utilize high-throughput genomic techniques in combination with bioinformatics/statistical analysis to generate hypothetical concepts. We then test these hypotheses using traditional molecular or cellular biological approaches and examine the functional relevance of innovative mechanisms using in vitro cell line and in vivo mouse models. Transcription factors of particular interest to us include androgen receptor (AR), FoxA1, Polycomb group protein (EZH2), and the Ets…

Peng Gao

Research Assistant Professor of Medicine (Hematology and Oncology)

PhD – Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC); Post-doctoral scholar – Proteomics & Mass Spectrometry Center at MUSC; Staff Scientist – Proteomics Center of Excellence at Northwestern University; Operation Director – Metabolomics Core Facility of RHLCCC at Northwestern University

Leonidas C Platanias

Professor of Medicine (Hematology and Oncology) and Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics

chronic leukemias, multiple myeloma, non-hodgkin’s lymphoma

Anaadriana Zakarija

Associate Professor of Medicine (Hematology and Oncology)

The diagnosis and treatment of bleeding disorders and their complications. Evaluation of causes of thrombosis and education regarding treatment and prevention of thrombosis.

Meejeon Roh

Research Assistant Professor of Medicine (Hematology and Oncology)

Understanding prostate cancer using molecular biology approaches in combination with transgenic mouse model has

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