Diet and Fitness Today – Complete Online Guide to Diet and Fitness

The online resource for diet and fitness including weight loss, low fat recipes, vitamins and minerals, nutrition, health and fitness. We have produced health, diet and fitness information along with a large selection of health calculators including an ideal weight calculator which estimates the time taken to achieve your ideal weight and a calories burned calculator. We also have a special body fat percentage section to estimate your body fat based on bmi, skinfolds or body dimensions. Why not Visit our new section on Fitness Vacations or search for your recommended daily allowance below with our free calculator.

Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) Search

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Diet and Fitness Ebooks – NEW!!!


Get your FREE Diet and Fitness ebooks here or click on the images below to find out more about our weight loss, health and fitness program.

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Nutrition Article

Phosphorus – Phosphorous is involved in bone and teeth formation as well as metabolism, kideny function, cell growth and heart muscle contraction. It not only help…
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Calories burned

Calculate the number of calories burned for running based on your weight and duration. Or search our database of calories burned for over 600 different activities. You can also use our new calories burned calculator to add up the calories burned for each day.
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Low Fat Recipes

Over 400 low fat recipes including low fat chicken recipes and low fat dessert recipes.

Body Mass Index

Online body mass index calculator and body fat calculators.

Calorie Counter

Find calories burned for 600 exercises such as cycling.

Glycemic Index

Glycemic index and glycemic load for over 1500 food items.

Food Nutrition

Find your recommended dietary allowance.

Health calculators

Use our Health calculators to find your ideal weight.

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The Complete 4-Week Beginner’s Workout Program

In the realm of fitness, three-month workout programs dominate the landscape. You’ve even seen plenty of them in our magazine over the years. Are they effective? Absolutely. But we’re going to let you in on an interesting secret: It doesn’t necessarily take 8 or 12 weeks to get your feet wet in the gym. Not that you’ll be a seasoned vet after four weeks, but if you can just get that first month under your belt, you’ll get yourself over the proverbial hump, where so many fail and give up, and set the stage for a lifetime of muscle gains.

Let’s just call this the accelerated beginner’s guide to bodybuilding. In this plan, your first month of training will be demanding, but not so demanding as to cause injury (or worse yet, burnout), and progressive in the sense that each week you’ll graduate to different exercises, higher volume, more intensity or all of the above. After four weeks you’ll not only be ready for the next challenge but you’ll have built a significant amount of quality muscle. In other words, one month from now you’ll look significantly better with your shirt off than you look now. (How’s that for results?)

This program isn’t just for the true beginner who has never touched a weight before; it’s also suitable for anyone who has taken an extended leave of absence from training. How long has it been since you went to the gym regularly? Six months? A year? Five years? No worries: The following routines will get you back on track in—you guessed it—just four short weeks. Let’s get to work.

Beginner’s Workout at a Glance

  • Week 1: Full-body split
  • Week 2: Two-day split: Upper body/Lower body
  • Week 3: Three-day split: Push/Pull/Legs
  • Week 4: Four-day split: Full body

Week 1: Whole in One

You’ll begin the program with a full-body training split, meaning you’ll train all major bodyparts in each workout (as opposed to “splitting up” your training). Train three days this first week, performing just one exercise per bodypart in each session. It’s important that you have a day of rest between each workout to allow your body to recover; this makes training Monday, Wednesday and Friday—with Saturday and Sunday being rest days—a good approach.

The exercises listed in Week 1 are a collection of basic moves that, while also used by advanced lifters, we feel are suitable for the beginner as well. Notice we’re not starting you off with only machine exercises; a handful of free-weight movements are present right off the bat. Reason being, these are the exercises you need to master for long-term gains in muscular size and strength, so you may as well start learning them now. Carefully read all exercise descriptions before attempting them yourself.

In Week 1 you’ll perform three sets of every exercise per workout, which over the course of the week adds up to nine sets total for each bodypart, a good starting volume for your purposes. With the exception of crunches for

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