Launch a Global Medical Career with Manipal’s American University of Antigua, College of Medicine

Medical students can be an efficient contingency workforce, provided their lack of training is suitably addressed. Being capable and ready to respond to COVID-19 like pandemic situation needs crucial emphasis on disaster management and emergency medicine. The world is faced with the reality of the shortage of physicians and healthcare providers due to the challenges posed by the current epidemiological peak. From the larger perspective, it is about how the shortage of physicians worldwide is going to impact the global health scenario. A lack of training renders medical students non-essential to patient care; on the other hand, clinical training is essential to generate future responders against COVID-19. What should be the focus of medical institutions and aspiring medical students?

Manipal’s American University of Antigua College of Medicine (AUA) is one such renowned institute in the Caribbean that helps students from different corners of the world to fulfill their dreams of becoming doctors. For nearly two decades, the university is training future physicians and offering a Doctor of Medicine (MD) degree. Gaining Experience in global healthcare is the way forward. AUA provides knowledge on global healthcare through its Global Health Track, which is conducted in collaboration with Florida International University (FIU). The purpose of the Global Health Track is to support and guide students in developing expertise in global health issues with the goal of subsequent career involvement involving patient care, service, policy making, research and education at a global level. 

Not all international medical universities and schools provide the opportunity to practice medicine in the US, Canada, the UK as well as in India. AUA’s curriculum is evaluated regularly to ensure that it is as per the standards of its USA and Canadian counterparts. AUA has collaborations/affiliations with many foreign universities like Florida International University (in the US), The University of Warwick (in the UK), and many others. Surrounded by beautiful nature with warm hospitality received from the people of the Caribbean region, AUA surely stands out to be a place to build a career in medicine and more than 3,000 students of AUA have graduated and are practicing in the US, Canada and the UK.

Manipal’s AUA emphasizes the need for well-rounded doctors. Hence, equal importance is given to the academic performance as well as emotional intelligence. The admission process is holistic that considers more than just the test scores

Alumnus Dr. Nandita Mahajan shares, “If anyone is planning to go for higher education in medicine, they should choose to go to AUA.”

The alumni of Manipal’s AUA stand testimonial to the difference being made by this institution in India as well as India’s contribution to global healthcare. The choice is usually driven by: greener pastures, studying abroad, acquiring a mere medical degree or contributing towards the larger purpose of improving the global healthcare scenario. 

Another alumnus Dr. Nandini Chattopadhyay reminisces, “The teaching that one receives in pre-clinical sciences in AUA, lay the foundation for clinical sciences. Everybody in AUA is always eager to help in

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3D metal printer at College of Dental Medicine expands possibilities for innovation

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IMAGE: The component that Renne was able to print for the ZIAN team.
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Credit: MUSC

When the Zucker Institute for Applied Neurosciences at the Medical University of South Carolina needed to bring to life a neurosurgeon’s idea for better instrumentation for sacroiliac surgery, there was one obvious partner to turn to: the MUSC College of Dental Medicine.

The college is the only dental program in the nation to have the Sisma Mysint100 3D selective laser fusion printer that creates 3D prints from metal rather than plastic, and Walter Renne, D.M.D., a professor in the Department of Oral Rehabilitation and assistant dean of innovation and digital dentistry, is eager to see what it can do.

“3D printing is how we get stuff from our imagination into reality. One of the issues in the past was most of what we could print was plastic, and plastic degrades. You need something to actually function,” he said. “Now, instead of imagining something and developing a plastic prototype that I can look at, I can imagine something and develop a real, usable final product that can be put into a drill or placed in a patient’s mouth. It’s really exciting to have that at the university.”

The manufacturer, Sisma, donated the printer about six months ago. Renne said Sisma wanted its latest device to find a home in a college that would think up creative and innovative uses for it. Those uses aren’t limited to dentistry, however.

The college and ZIAN have collaborated in the past, so it was natural for ZIAN to turn to Renne and colleagues for help with this project, which started with an idea from Stephen Kalhorn, M.D., a professor in the Department of Neurosurgery.

Kalhorn has worked several times before with ZIAN, a technology accelerator that exists to help MUSC’s medical providers to develop their ideas for new devices or device improvements.

“I run things by them because then I can spend the majority of my time in the operating room actively helping patients,” he said. “I can literally drop off a napkin sketch at a ZIAN engineer’s desk or even less than that. There’s even been times that I’ve just drawn on the dry-erase board in the OR and taken a picture and sent it to them, and they’re off to the races.”

This time, Kalhorn had an idea to improve sacroiliac joint fusion surgery. The sacroiliac joint is where the pelvis and spine meet; it is also a source of lower back pain. Fusion surgery encourages the two bones to grow together into one so there is no wiggle room between the two.

Bony fusion requires three elements, Kalhorn explained: stabilization, such as when a cast is placed on a broken limb; decortication, which is the removal of the top layer of tissue to ensure there’s no cartilage or fibrous material blocking the bone cells from building a bridge between the two bones; and compression, whereby the pressure encourages more bone growth. But nothing on the

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UNE to move its College of Osteopathic Medicine to Portland

BIDDEFORD, Maine (AP) — Funding from the Harold Alfond Foundation will help the University of New England move the College of Osteopathic Medicine from the main campus in Biddeford to a 100,000-square-foot building in Portland, the university announced Tuesday.

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The $30 million grant also will be used to accelerate high-growth undergraduate and graduate programs to meet student demand and workforce needs in areas like aquaculture, entrepreneurship, criminal justice and sports media communication, among others, officials said.

The move of the College of Osteopathic Medicine will put it on the Portland campus along with other health-related programs like dentistry, pharmacy, physician assistant, nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, social work, dental hygiene and nurse anesthesia.

“With a truly integrated health care campus, like none other in our region, our health professions students will capitalize on opportunities for cross-professional learning, enhance their team-based competencies, and will benefit from amazing new learning spaces that will complement UNE’s existing assets,” said UNE President James Herbert.

The university hopes to break ground on the new building in the spring 2022 and looks to the fall 2023 as a targeted completion date, officials said.

The grant from the Harold Alfond Foundation is part of a $500 million commitment over 12 years to provide an economic boost to the state.

“We believe that two fundamental components of a bright future for Maine are a high-quality education and a healthy population, and UNE is a significant contributor toward both of these goals,” said Greg Powell, chairman of the foundation.

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College of Medicine researcher makes novel discoveries in preventing epileptic seizures

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IMAGE: Sanjay Kumar, an associate professor in the Florida State University College of Medicine’s Department of Biomedical Sciences
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Credit: Colin Hackley

A team of researchers from the Florida State University College of Medicine has found that an amino acid produced by the brain could play a crucial role in preventing a type of epileptic seizure.

Temporal lobe epileptic seizures are debilitating and can cause lasting damage in patients, including neuronal death and loss of neuron function.

Sanjay Kumar, an associate professor in the College of Medicine’s Department of Biomedical Sciences, and his team are paving the way toward finding effective therapies for this disease.

The research team found a mechanism in the brain responsible for triggering epileptic seizures. Their research indicates that an amino acid known as D-serine could work with the mechanism to help prevent epileptic seizures, thereby also preventing the death of neural cells that accompanies them.

The team’s findings were published in the journal Nature Communications.

The temporal lobe processes sensory information and creates memories, comprehends language and controls emotions. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of epilepsy in adults and is not improved with current anti-epileptic medications.

“A hallmark of TLE is the loss of a vulnerable population of neurons in a particular brain region called the entorhinal area,” Kumar said. “We’re trying to understand why neurons die in this brain region in the first place. From there, is there anything that we can do to stop these neurons from dying? It’s a very fundamental question.”

To help further understand TLE pathophysiology, the Kumar lab studies underlying receptors in the brain. Receptors are proteins located in the gaps, or junctions, between two or more communicating neurons. They convert signals between the neurons, aiding in their communication.

Kumar and his team discovered a new type of receptor that they informally named the “FSU receptor” in the entorhinal cortex of the brain. The FSU receptor is a potential target for TLE therapy.

“What’s striking about this receptor is that it is highly calcium-permeable, which is what we believe underlies the hyperexcitability and the damage to neurons in this region,” Kumar said.

When FSU receptors allow too much calcium to enter neurons, TLE patients experience epileptic seizures as neurons become overstimulated from the influx. The overstimulation, or hyperexcitability, is what causes neurons to die, a process known as excitotoxicity.

The research team also found that the amino acid D-serine blocks these receptors to prevent excess levels of calcium from reaching neurons, thereby preventing seizure activity and neuronal death.

“What’s unique about D-serine, unlike any other drugs that are out there, is that D-serine is made in the brain itself, so it’s well-tolerated by the brain,” Kumar said. “Many medications that deal with treating TLE are not well-tolerated, but given that this is made in the brain, it works very well.”

With assistance from Michael Roper’s lab in the FSU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, the research team found that D-serine levels were depleted

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Carle Illinois College of Medicine


Rule-breaker. Boundary-pusher. Creative innovator ready to ignite a revolution in health care. Sound familiar? If so, then we encourage you to apply to Carle Illinois.

Apply + Grow

The Carle Illinois College of Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is the first college of medicine in the world specifically designed at the intersection of engineering and medicine.

Journey + Experience

A curriculum as innovative as you. The Illinois Model for medical education is the world’s first curriculum infusing engineering, medicine and humanities to create a truly innovative future centered on the human condition.

Life + Wellness

You’ll love life in Champaign-Urbana. With few distractions and surprisingly urban amenities, Champaign-Urbana is an affordable, culturally diverse community. And, our wellness resources will equip you for life as a physician-innovator.

Are you a prospective student? Sign up for email updates.

World-class research faculty in the classroom.

From inventing the MRI to discovering the third domain of life, Illinois research pioneers have been improving the human condition for 150 years.

Breakthrough research

From inventing the MRI to discovering the third domain of life, Illinois research pioneers have been improving the human condition for 150 years.

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Inaugural faculty, Carle Illinois College of Medicine

World-class research faculty in the classroom

Carle Illinois faculty has a broad range of expertise and are shaping the future of health care delivery, technology and medical education.

Meet the faculty

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Internal Medicine Department | Ohio State College of Medicine

Voted “Among America’s Best” in Healthcare

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center’s Department of Internal Medicine is the largest department in one of the nation’s leading academic medical centers and is comprised of 15 specialty divisions.

The department has been recognized by U.S. News & World Report in multiple areas. While seven programs at OSUWMC were identified by this report, five of these programs are within internal medicine and are among the best in the country, including cancer, heart disease, kidney disease, diabetes and endocrine disorders and pulmonary and geriatrics. The department’s gastroenterology and geriatrics programs were also recognized as high performing.

The Internal Medicine Residency Training Program is one of 21 institutions recognized for innovation in training the next generation of internists. Our designation as an Educational Innovation Project places us in the top five percent of training programs in internal medicine. The focus of our educational innovation effort includes verifying competency, emphasizing team work in mastering skills, transition of care, linking educational and clinical quality improvement.

Our Mission

The mission of the Department of Internal Medicine is to improve the lives of people through innovation in research, education and patient care. Our vision is that in working as a team we will shape the future of medicine by creating, disseminating and applying new knowledge to meet the needs of each individual.

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Einstein/Montefiore Department of Medicine | Albert Einstein College of Medicine | Montefiore Medical Center

Michelle Gong, MD
Michelle Ng Gong, M.D., M.S., Named Chief of Division of Pulmonary Medicine 

Dr. Michelle Ng Gong has been named chief of the division of pulmonary medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System. Dr. Gong is currently chief of the division of critical care medicine at Einstein and Montefiore, as well as leader of the unified Jay B. Langer Critical Care Network.

newsletter fall
Department of Medicine 2019 Fall/Winter Newsletter 

SOD18Medicine Chair Presents 2019 State of the Department and 5-year Strategic Plan

On Thursday, September 26, 2019, Dr. Yaron Tomer presented the 2019 State of the Department, at a special Grand Rounds held at Cherkasky Auditorium on the Moses campus. In addition to highlighting the many achievements across the department, Dr. Tomer introduced Medicine’s new Strategic Plan, which will serve as a blueprint for the next five years. View the Zoom video here; download a pdf copy of the presentation here; and view the Strategic Plan online here 

Casey 
Mourning the Loss of Joan Casey MD, Beloved Mentor and Renowned Infectious Diseases Expert
The Montefiore Einstein Department of Medicine mourns the loss of Joan Iris Casey, MD, Professor Emerita of Medicine and an illustrious member of the Montefiore Einstein community, who passed away on May 19, 2019. “Joan was a towering figure in the Division of Infectious Diseases, of which she was a founding member, and the Department of Medicine,” said Liise-anne Pirofski, MD, Professor of Medicine and Chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases.

Michelle Gong, MD
Dr. Michelle Ng Gong Named Chief, Division of Critical Care Medicine 

Michelle Ng Gong, MD, MS, Associate Chief of Academic
Affairs, Director of Critical Care Research in the Division of Critical Care
Medicine, and Professor in the Departments of Medicine (Critical Care Medicine)
and Epidemiology & Population Health, has been named Chief of the Division of Critical Care Medicine.

Doris JW Escher, MD 
Mourning the Loss of Dr. Doris JW Escher, a Pioneering Cardiologist
The Montefiore Einstein Department of Medicine and the James and Ruth Scheuer Division of Cardiology mourn the loss of Doris JW Escher, MD, our longtime colleague, friend and mentor, who passed away on April 3, 2019, at 101. Dr. Escher, who first joined Montefiore as a trainee in 1942, was the founder and first director of its Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory and achieved an international reputation as one of the early innovators in pacemaker technology. Until her retirement in 2006 at the age of 88, Dr. Escher was a professor of Medicine (Cardiology) and an active clinical cardiologist who was beloved by her patients.

C Rodriguez 165 
Dr. Carlos Rodriguez Joins Montefiore Einstein Cardiology
Carlos Rodriguez, MD, MPH has joined Montefiore Health System and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine as Vice Chair for Academic Affairs, Director of Cardiovascular Research, and Director of Cardiovascular Epidemiology. His tenure will begin on April 1.

Jariwala 
Dr. Sunit Jariwala Named Director Clinical and Research Innovation
Sunit P. Jariwala, MD, an Associate Professor of Medicine in the Division of Allergy and Immunology, Director of Allergy/Immunology Research, and Lead Adult Allergist/Immunologist at

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Faculty Profiles – Drexel University College of Medicine

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American College Health Association (ACHA)




NEW: COVID-19 FAQs for College Health Professionals Available

News and Announcements

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All ACHA members receive The Source, ACHA’s weekly newsletter. Each week’s newsletter contains association announcements; industry news and resources; advocacy and policy highlights related to health and higher education; and featured job opportunities pulled from our careers website. ACHA members also receive special news alerts and updates from their coalitions, regional affiliates, and sections. Not receiving emails? Send us an email and let us know.

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ACHA News, Programs, and Services

ACHA National Election: Slate of Candidates

The 2020 ACHA National Election will be conducted via the ACHA website March 20–April 20, 2020. View the slate of candidates for officers of the association, regional representatives on the Board of Directors, and section officers.

ACHA Signs Letter of Support for H.R. 2339

ACHA joins 75 other national organizations in support of H.R. 2339, the Reversing the Youth Tobacco Epidemic Act of 2019. Read the letter here.

Join Us In Celebrating ACHA’s 100th Anniversary!

This year, ACHA turns 100, and we’re excited to introduce a brand new ACHA logo, which underwent a redesign in celebration of our 100-year anniversary! Check out our new anniversary website, featuring achievements from the past 100 years, an interactive timeline, and information on the upcoming anniversary celebration which will take place during the 2020 Annual Meeting in Chicago.

Healthy Students: Our Gift to the Future

As we celebrate 100 years of ACHA, we invite you to join the ACHF Capital Campaign to transform the future of student health and well-being. The American College Health Foundation seeks to create resources with life-enhancing potentials and programs to support the health and well-being of 19 million college students, and help college health workers adapt to our changing times. You can help us plant the seeds of success!

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College of Osteopathic Medicine | NYIT


Academic Degrees

NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine

Fast Fact: College of Osteopathic Medicine

NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine’s Class of 2019 had a perfect 99% match/placement rate for residencies.

Locations

Long Island, NY

Serota Academic Center, room 203
Northern Boulevard
P.O. Box 8000
Old Westbury, NY 11568
516.686.3747
comadm@nyit.edu
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Jonesboro, AR

  • Feb 12 — Do you want to know what it’s like being a medical student at @nyitcomar? Well, you’re in luck! Meet Reuben Horace Jr, MPH, who will be taking over our Instagram stories today!
  • Jan 24 — .@NYITCOMDO student Danny MacKenzie Jr. (COM ’22) is on a mission to destigmatize the conversation surrounding mental illness with his organization called “A Smile Is…”. https://fal.cn/36bUP
  • Jan 22 — Not all heroines wear capes, but this one does! Naima Masud, OMS III at NYITCOM-Ar is helping others battling leukemia by donating peripheral stem cells through Be The Match. https://fal.cn/369Zg


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