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The Complete 4-Week Beginner’s Workout Program

In the realm of fitness, three-month workout programs dominate the landscape. You’ve even seen plenty of them in our magazine over the years. Are they effective? Absolutely. But we’re going to let you in on an interesting secret: It doesn’t necessarily take 8 or 12 weeks to get your feet wet in the gym. Not that you’ll be a seasoned vet after four weeks, but if you can just get that first month under your belt, you’ll get yourself over the proverbial hump, where so many fail and give up, and set the stage for a lifetime of muscle gains.

Let’s just call this the accelerated beginner’s guide to bodybuilding. In this plan, your first month of training will be demanding, but not so demanding as to cause injury (or worse yet, burnout), and progressive in the sense that each week you’ll graduate to different exercises, higher volume, more intensity or all of the above. After four weeks you’ll not only be ready for the next challenge but you’ll have built a significant amount of quality muscle. In other words, one month from now you’ll look significantly better with your shirt off than you look now. (How’s that for results?)

This program isn’t just for the true beginner who has never touched a weight before; it’s also suitable for anyone who has taken an extended leave of absence from training. How long has it been since you went to the gym regularly? Six months? A year? Five years? No worries: The following routines will get you back on track in—you guessed it—just four short weeks. Let’s get to work.

Beginner’s Workout at a Glance

  • Week 1: Full-body split
  • Week 2: Two-day split: Upper body/Lower body
  • Week 3: Three-day split: Push/Pull/Legs
  • Week 4: Four-day split: Full body

Week 1: Whole in One

You’ll begin the program with a full-body training split, meaning you’ll train all major bodyparts in each workout (as opposed to “splitting up” your training). Train three days this first week, performing just one exercise per bodypart in each session. It’s important that you have a day of rest between each workout to allow your body to recover; this makes training Monday, Wednesday and Friday—with Saturday and Sunday being rest days—a good approach.

The exercises listed in Week 1 are a collection of basic moves that, while also used by advanced lifters, we feel are suitable for the beginner as well. Notice we’re not starting you off with only machine exercises; a handful of free-weight movements are present right off the bat. Reason being, these are the exercises you need to master for long-term gains in muscular size and strength, so you may as well start learning them now. Carefully read all exercise descriptions before attempting them yourself.

In Week 1 you’ll perform three sets of every exercise per workout, which over the course of the week adds up to nine sets total for each bodypart, a good starting volume for your purposes. With the exception of crunches for

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UCSD’s Practical Guide to Clinical Medicine

UCSD’s Practical Guide to Clinical Medicine


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UCSD’s Practical Guide to Clinical Medicine

A comprehensive physical examination and clinical education site for medical students
and other health care professionals

Web Site Design by Jan Thompson, Program Representative, UCSD School of Medicine.

Content and Photographs by Charlie Goldberg, M.D., UCSD School of Medicine and VA Medical Center, San Diego, California 92093-0611.

Send Comments to: Charlie Goldberg, M.D.




Introduction



This guide has been assembled with an eye towards clinical relevance. It represents a departure from the usual physical exam teaching tools which, in their attempts to be all inclusive, tend to de-emphasize the practical nature of patient care. As a result, students frequently have difficulty identifying what information is truly relevant, why it’s important and how it applies to the actual patient. By approaching clinical medicine in a pragmatic and demystified fashion, the significance of the material should be readily apparent and the underlying principles more clearly understood. In particular:

  1. Each section is constructed to answer the question: “What do I really need to know about this area of medical care?” The material covered is presented in a concise, ordered fashion that should be readily applicable to the common clinical scenarios that you will actually see in day to day practice. Esoterica has been purposely excluded.
  2. The Web-Based format allows for easy access to information and provides integration of text, pictures, and sound.
  3. Exam techniques are described in step-by-step detail. Special maneuvers that are frequently utilized are also described.
  4. The rationale for each aspect of the examination is addressed and, where appropriate, relevant pathophysiology discussed.
  5. Detailed descriptions of how to function in clinical settings are included. In general, students identify their role in patient care either by trial and error or through the beneficence of more advanced students, residents or staff. This is not particularly efficient and diminishes the potential for learning and fun. The following sections are included to specifically address this issue:
    1. Oral presentations
    2. Patient write-ups
    3. Working in outpatient clinics
    4. Functioning on an inpatient service
    5. Clinical decision making
  6. Pictures clearly identifying appropriate techniques accompany each section. Examples of common pathologic findings are included as well.
  7. Images of gross anatomic correlates (denoted by the “daVinci Icon” shown above) are incorporated within a number of the segments.
  8. Video clips of selected examination maneuvers and findings.
  9. Carefully selected links to other useful websites are available.

I hope that this site helps to make the educational process both fun and rewarding.
As the skills required of a physician cannot be learned from any single source,
I encourage you to make use of as many other references as possible. This should
reinforce basic principles and alert you to the fact that there are often many
ways of achieving the same end (i.e. there is frequently no single right way
of doing something). What follows, then, serves merely as

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5 Simple Tips for Fitness Success

Congratulations on taking a forward step to get in shape and feel great. Many people are guilty of wishing they could get a sculpted body from eating junk food and watching TV all day. But that is just not going to happen. Even though getting in shape sounds like a long, time-wasting process, the effort put towards being in shape has many positive effects. If you want to start your journey to having a better body to feel great, here are some tips:

1. Exercise Daily

Exercise daily for at least an hour. You do not have to kill yourself from running, jogging, etc., but you should have some sort of moderate physical activity in your everyday life. If you’re looking to shed a few pounds fast, do a higher-level intensity workout. For example, go on a walk at a brisk pace for an hour. Or, you can jog and set certain intervals to sprint during that hour. Make sure you’re not in severe pain during your workout. Just a warning, your muscles will ache after a high intensity workout. It may be irritating, but that means your body is changing for the better. Be sure to stay hydrated, stretch, and eat foods with a decent amount of protein after each workout. The protein will help keep your muscles, not fat, rebuilding.

2. Eat the Right Foods and Portion Each Meal

No matter how bad your stomach is telling you to go for candy over healthy food, try to stay away from sweets. Sugar from candy will not help you get in shape. Even if it’s just a single candy bar, one will eventually lead to another. Fruits and vegetables are the best thing to eat when getting into shape. Apples, for example, do a good job at making the stomach feel full for up to 3 to 4 hours. Green vegetables such as green beans and broccoli keep the digestive system clean and running.

Also, stick to lean meats like turkey and chicken. Seafood, such as, shrimp, and tilapia are also great alternatives. These foods are full of protein and healthy nutrients to help keep muscles fit and ready for workouts. In addition, be sure to portion what you eat. Having a good metabolism comes from portioning meals. Try to plan out eating six times a day and setting smaller portions, rather than having three large meals throughout the day. This will also help you find yourself breathing smoother when working out rather than huffing and puffing for air. This is because you will have less food in your digestive system, which means more energy is used toward your exercise.

3. Keep Track of Calories and Food Intake Per Day

Keeping track of how many calories you eat in a day will be helpful in planning out your physical exercising. Ever wonder why body builders’ body masses are so big? That’s because they plan out their meals and take in more (healthy) calories than the average person. On the

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Fitness Images [HD] – Download Free Stock Photos

You’ll find tons of fitness pictures showcasing the hard work people put in to stay healthy. From the avid runner to the lean, mean fighting machine, you’ll find a range of different fitness photos. The fitness photography in this collection includes everything from the relaxed yogi to the powerful weightlifter. You’ll find pictures of runners, weightlifters, cardio-machine users, dancers, and more. Pictures of different types of workouts are also included in this collection such as push-ups, sit-ups, curls, stretches and a few other workouts. Our collection includes empowering images of strong men and women.

You can use our fitness images in anyway, shape or form according to our Creative Commons Zero license. Are you opening up a local gym in your community? You can use our fitness pictures for your website, flyers and more. Do you own an online store in the fitness niche? Our fitness images can be used for your blog content, banner images, and ads. Are you teaching a class on positive health habits? You’re free to use any of our images for your presentations, brochures and other related marketing materials. Are you a fitness instructor working on building your social media presence? You can add motivational quotes to our inspiring fitness photography to help motivate your clients. Are you working on a school assignment for your physical education class? You’re able to choose from any of our fitness images.

We’re busy pumping out new fitness pictures for this collection. Our images are royalty-free & high resolution. So be sure to check back often to see new additions to keep your projects strong.

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Fitness Fitness basics – Mayo Clinic

Related videos and articles

Starting a fitness program may be one of the best things you can do for your health. After all, physical activity can reduce your risk of chronic disease, improve your balance and coordination, help you lose weight, and even boost your self-esteem. And you can reap these benefits regardless of your age, sex or physical ability.

The Department of Health and Human Services recommends that healthy adults include aerobic activity and strength training in their fitness plans, specifically:

  • At least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity a week, or an equivalent combination of moderate and vigorous aerobic activity
  • Strength training exercises of all the major muscle groups at least twice a week

Regular exercise can help you control your weight, reduce your risk of heart disease and certain cancers, and strengthen your bones and muscles. But if you haven’t exercised for some time and you have health concerns, you may want to talk to your doctor before starting a new fitness routine.

When you’re designing your personal fitness program, consider your fitness goals. Think about your fitness likes and dislikes, and note your personal barriers to fitness. Then consider practical strategies for keeping your fitness program on track.

Starting a fitness program is an important decision, but it doesn’t have to be an overwhelming one. By planning carefully and pacing yourself, you can make fitness a healthy habit that lasts a lifetime.

Oct. 11, 2019


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Florida Department of Health in Pinellas

Pinellas County Government COVID orders 

State of Florida COVID executive orders 

• As of Monday, March 30, the Tarpon Springs and Largo centers will be temporarily closed to clients. Signs on the doors will ask visitors to call for information or appointments. We will have very minimal staff there to answer phones.

• We will also have staff stationed at tables at the entrances to the centers that are open to screen clients. Clinical Health Services staff are handling those duties.

• WIC has already transitioned to services by phone or www.WIChealth.org. Only a very small number of services (e.g., distribution of formula and breast pumps) will be provided in person. Families can call (727) 824-6913 or 6914 for information.

• Dental services are currently limited to relief of pain and management of infection.

• Medical Services clients will be triaged by phone to determine if an in-person visit is needed.

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